Cooperative Extension Service
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Your source for pest management and pesticide news

May 2004/Volume 27, No. 5

We need to clear up confusion regarding pesticide record keeping

HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

If you think a person in your family has been poisoned by a pesticide, quick action may be critical. What should you do?
Mosquito season is upon us; this repeat story from last year will help you protect your family
Pest control companies should see opportunities when weather conditions favor mosquitoes

FEDERAL NEWS

The EPA has posted their schedule for Reregistration and Tolerance Reassessment
The EPA is seeking comments for a draft document about labeling statements for mosquito products used for area-wide applications to control adult mosquitoes

BIOTECHNOLOGY

According to North American Breeding Bird Survey, Bt cotton has increased songbird populations

IPM NOTEBOOK

The biology and ecology of the pest is the fundamental element of IPM, but some people will not accept that fact
Pest management companies should consider offering an IPM service

NEWS YOU CAN USE

The USDA has two grant programs to promote and develop organic agriculture
Michigan State University, Purdue University, and the University of Illinois are joining resources to bring seasonal advice to field crop and vegetable growers interested in organic agriculture
People often ask us where we find information about pesticides

DON'T DO IT

William C. Murphy of Glencoe, Alabama, was ordered to pay $45,305 and to stay as a guest of the Alabama prison system for nearly four years after his conviction on 17 FIFRA violations and 11 counts of trafficking in counterfeit goods


We need to clear up confusion regarding pesticide record keeping. Based on a call I received from the USDA pesticide record-keeping department, some people think that private pesticide applicators do not have to keep any pesticide records. We are concerned that some extension personnel may be unclear on the rules.

This web site has a form you can use to keep pesticide records. http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/C848.htm

You do not have to use this form, and you are not required to send your pesticide records to anyone. The law requires that you keep pesticide records for at least two years. We recommend that you keep pesticide records forever.

Health and the Environment

If you think a person in your family has been poisoned by a pesticide, quick action may be critical. What should you do? Should you follow the first aid directions on the pesticide labeling? Should you call Poison Control or 911? Should you try to make the person vomit?

  1. Stop the pesticide exposure. Rinse pesticide from the skin or eye immediately. Remove any clothing that is contaminated with pesticide. Try to avoid contaminating yourself.
  2. If the person has emergency symptoms (e.g., unconscious, convulsions, not breathing), call 911 immediately. Administer artificial respiration if necessary.
  3. For less severe symptoms, call Poison Control (800-222-1222). This number works anywhere in the country. You will be automatically routed to the appropriate office in your state. You will need to know the name of the pesticide.
  4. Do not waste time trying to make the person vomit unless you are directed to do so by Poison Control.
  5. The first aid directions on the pesticide label will be useful for less severe symptoms.
  6. If a person is exposed to a pesticide with the signal word "DANGER," he or she will need to visit a physician.

The advice is similar if your pet is exposed to a pesticide. After all, many people consider their pet to be just like a member of the family. We have a big, dumb mutt that is just like my brother-in-law. He will not be insulted by this comment, but I am glad the dog cannot read.

  1. Stop the pesticide exposure. Rinse pesticide from the skin or eye immediately. Try to avoid contaminating yourself.
  2. If the animal has emergency symptoms (e.g., unconscious, convulsions, not breathing), call your veterinarian immediately. Administer artificial respiration if necessary. These web sites offer instructions on artificial respiration for dogs and cats. http://www.doctordog.com/dogbook/dogartres.html and http://fl.essortment.com/catsbreathingp_rybc.htm
  3. For less severe symptoms, call Poison Control (800-222-1222). Pesticide first aid for mammalian pets will be similar to actions appropriate for humans.
  4. Do not waste time trying to make the pet vomit unless you are directed to do so by Poison Control.
  5. The first aid directions on the pesticide label will be useful for less severe symptoms.
  6. If a pet is exposed to a pesticide with the signal word "DANGER", they will need to visit a veterinarian.

Mosquito season is upon us; this repeat story from last year will help you protect your family.

toys the cat bowl an empty bottle a tire swing
cans in the recycle bin a tree hole an old shoe a garbage can
the open top of a basketball pole the gutter a birdbath a grill top
flowerpots a wheelbarrow an empty bag that once held pork rinds

Before you get the wrong impression, the entomologist found all of this old junk in my friend's yard, not mine.

Mosquitoes may complete development in the water in 4-5 days. If the water cannot be changed, buy a product that contains Bacillus thuringiensis israeliensis (often available as "Mosquito Dunks). The bacteria kill mosquito larvae but are safe for everything else. Goldfish can control mosquitoes in small ponds. I started a small school of goldfish in my ornamental pond with feeder goldfish from the pet shop at a total cost of about $2.00 (40 goldfish @ 5 cents each).

Mosquitoes are less attracted to light clothing than dark. Certain types of mosquitoes prefer pregnant women. Some types of mosquitoes prefer human skin temperatures over 90 degrees F. If you are attending an outdoor party, be cool, wear light clothes and chat with pregnant women who prefer Gothic styles. Be aware, mosquitoes can bite through T-shirts and other lightweight, tight-fitting clothing. I guess another option would be to attend outdoor summer parties wearing a heavy, loose coat. (You won't be invited to many outdoor summer parties, but maybe you and the pregnant Gothic woman will hit it off.)

Use insect repellents wisely. Look for products that contain DEET (N, N-diethyl-m-toluamide). This web site has additional information about using insect repellents. http://entomology.ent.uga.edu/publications/protect_against_bites.htm

Residual insecticides (malathion, permethrin) can be applied to areas where mosquitoes rest during the heat of the day. Sites may include shrubbery, ground covers and underbrush. At my old house, wild grape ivy was a haven for large numbers of mosquitoes. (I mowed instead of spraying.)

Burning mosquito coils, usually containing pyrethrin, at a stationary location outside can give relief in the immediate area.

Pest control companies should see opportunities when weather conditions favor mosquitoes. You should not try to scare people or offer services you cannot provide, but many people are not able to scout their property for mosquito breeding sites, and other people would rather pay for that service than using their time. Some companies may also be able to offer community programs in areas where government is not providing that service.

Federal News

The EPA has posted their schedule for Reregistration and Tolerance Reassessment. Pesticides to watch in 2004 include benfluralin, trifluralin, amitraz, dimeothate, and putrescent whole eggs. You will find the whole schedule here. http://cfpub.epa.gov/oppref/rereg/status.cfm?show=sched

Unless you have been away on an extended voyage, you know that EPA is assessing risks and making risk management decisions for older pesticides. These decisions are summarized in documents known as REDs, IREDs, and TREDs. If you have been on an extended voyage, you may have expected this process to be finished by now since reregistration started in 1988. The EPA reports that reregistration is 71 percent complete.

RED -- When EPA completes the review and risk management decision for a pesticide that is subject to reregistration (that is, one initially registered before November 1984), the Agency generally issues a Reregistration Eligibility Decision or RED document. The RED summarizes the risk assessment conclusions and outlines any risk reduction measures necessary for the pesticide to continue to be registered in the U.S.

EPA issues an Interim RED (or IRED) for a pesticide that is undergoing reregistration, requires a reregistration eligibility decision, and also needs a cumulative assessment as a result of FQPA because it is part of a group of pesticides that share a common mechanism of toxicity. The IRED, issued after EPA completes the individual pesticide's aggregate risk assessment, may initiate risk reduction measures -- for example, reducing risks to workers or eliminating uses that the registrant no longer wishes to maintain --- to gain the benefits of these changes before the final RED can be issued, following the Agency's consideration of cumulative risks. For example, an IRED would be issued for a carbamate insecticide because the aggregate analysis required by FQPA for all the carbamates has not been completed.

EPA issues a TRED (Reports on FQPA Tolerance Reassessment Progress and [Interim] Risk Management Decisions) for a pesticide that requires tolerance reassessment decisions, but does not require a reregistration eligibility decision at present because:

Like IREDs, some TREDs will not become final until EPA considers the cumulative risks of all the pesticides in the cumulative group.

You should note the scheduled decision for pesticides that you need. Watch for opportunities to provide comments on the decision well in advance of the decision date. Also beware of negotiation between the registrant and EPA that can cancel pesticide registrations with little or no input from the people who need the products.

The EPA is seeking comments for a draft document about labeling statements for mosquito products used for area-wide applications to control adult mosquitoes. Pesticide products intended for homeowner use or for the control of mosquito larvae are not included in the draft recommendations. The proposal concerns pesticide products that are typically applied by ultra-low volume aerial or ground application methods. EPA has developed these proposals to help clarify some labeling statements that may have been unclear to users and to promote consistency between label statements for this class of products. The new language will help public health mosquito control officials optimize mosquito control techniques while ensuring that use of these products will not pose unreasonable risks to public health or the environment. EPA worked with state agencies to develop initial recommendations on this issue. The Agency will accept comments on the proposals for 90 days. The document, called "Labeling Statements on Products Used for Adult Mosquito Control," is available at: http://www.epa.gov/PR_Notices/

Biotechnology

According to North American Breeding Bird Survey, Bt cotton has increased songbird populations. Bt cotton is genetically engineered to express Bacillus thuringiensis proteins that are toxic to caterpillars; cotton growers apply much less insecticides to Bt cotton fields. Bt cotton came into the market in 1996; since that time songbird populations have grown 20 percent in Arizona, 37 percent in Mississippi, 34 percent in Alabama, and 10 percent in Texas. Absolute proof is not available, but logic promotes the case. When farmers had to use regular applications of broad-spectrum insecticides, a cotton field provided little food for birds. (Chemically Speaking, March 2004)

IPM Notebook

The biology and ecology of the pest is the fundamental element of IPM, but some people will not accept that fact. A homeowner called this week and complained of a chronic problem with Indian meal moth. They had spent more than $100 on pesticides in an attempt to control the problem. Indian meal moth must have an appropriate source of food, which includes a wide variety of grains, seeds, and grains/seed products. Unless you can eliminate the food source, Indian meal moth is nearly impossible to control with or without pesticides. If you can get rid of the food source, pesticides are unnecessary to control Indian meal moth.

Other pests have critical vulnerabilities. Mosquitoes can only breed in water. Slugs must have a moist place to hide during the heat of the day. A little Kryptonite will keep Supermen from multiplying to annoying numbers under the sofa. Weeds and diseases require particular conditions to thrive. If you have a severe pest problem, you are providing the conditions that favor your pests. The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service can help. Contact your local extension office and visit our web sites. This web site will help you find your local extension office http://128.192.110.246/sublist.cfm

Pest management companies should consider offering an IPM service. A caller this week reported that a pest control company advised against spraying for Indian meal moth. I was impressed because many companies would spray and collect a fee from the client. The company that offered the IPM advice should also have some mechanism to be compensated for their expertise. You still have to pay a doctor even if they do not give you a prescription.

Some industries (e.g., like attorneys) offer a subscription-like service that provides steady income. For a monthly fee, you can contact an attorney at any time. Many pest control companies offer a monthly service, but the contracts typically focus on a regular spray treatment instead of professional expertise and advice. The pest control industry should explore a market that emphasizes knowledge over pesticides.

News You Can Use

The USDA has two grant programs to promote and develop organic agriculture. The purpose of the first program area is to fund the development and implementation of research, extension and higher education programs to improve the competitiveness of organic producers. Projects should plan to deliver applied production information to producers and students. The second program area is to fund research and extension programs that will enhance the ability of producers and processors who have already adopted organic standards to grow and market high quality organic food, feed, and fiber. You can find out more at http://www.csrees.usda.gov/funding/rfas/04_organic.html

Michigan State University, Purdue University, and the University of Illinois are joining resources to bring seasonal advice to field crop and vegetable growers interested in organic agriculture. http://www.ipm.msu.edu/new-ag.htm Some of the information will apply to growers in other parts of the country. Other advice is not appropriate for other areas.

The market for organic products is growing very quickly. Every grower and every market are not appropriate for organic production, but every wise producer will consider new ways to make money. You do the same old thing; you get the same old thing. Here are two web sites that offer a lot of resources http://www.ers.usda.gov/Briefing/Organic/ and http://omri.org/

Pest control companies should not ignore the growing interest in the organic market. What kinds of services could your company offer and legitimately market as "organic"? Check with your state regulatory agency to find out if there are restrictions on the ways you can market new services.

People often ask us where we find information about pesticides. The first thing I tell them is that I do not find information; as an expert I already know pretty much everything. Secondly, most people cannot tell when I am making things up. If the caller persists, I tell them about the sources I find the most complete and reliable. At the risk of making myself obsolete . . .

The National Pesticide Information Center at http://npic.orst.edu/ or 1-800-858-7378 is an excellent source of information and links for professionals and home pesticide users.

EXTOXNET http://extoxnet.orst.edu/ is another web site maintained by Oregon State University. You can easily find information about environmental and health effects associated with specific pesticides.

Crop Data Management Systems http://www.cdms.net/manuf/manuf.asp maintains a good source for pesticide labels and Material Data Safety Sheets. If this site does not have the desired label or MSDS, you can probably find it with an Internet search.

EPA http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/ has a great deal of regulatory, safety, and other information about pesticides.

Georgia Department of Agriculture http://www.agr.state.ga.us/html/pesticide_division.html provides information about regulation of pesticides in Georgia. You can find out what pesticides are registered in Georgia, how to apply for a pesticide license, how to get pesticide training and much more.

Now that you know our secrets, you may think that my position is superfluous. Actually the tremendous amount of information makes my job even more valuable. As you know, one weakness of the Internet is that it is often impossible to distinguish valuable information from junk science, advertising, and trash. Although insect traps based in sex pheromones can be valuable IPM tools, your job would probably be at risk if you search for "sex pheromone" from your workstation. People need an expert to elucidate information that may be prepensely or inadvertently obfuscatory and daedal. A search for "head transplant" yields more than 300,000 sites, but it is still difficult to do at home.

Don't Do It

William C. Murphy of Glencoe, Alabama, was ordered to pay $45,305 and to stay as a guest of the Alabama prison system for nearly four years after his conviction on 17 FIFRA violations and 11 counts of trafficking in counterfeit goods. His company, Sierra Chemical, sold counterfeit, misbranded, adulterated and/or mislabeled pesticides to municipalities in Alabama and Georgia. The towns thought the products would help them control mosquitoes and West Nile virus. Fake products do not protect the public, and they pose unknown environmental threats. (EPA Pesticide Program Update, 4-30-04)

There are two basic ways that people get in trouble with pesticides. Accidents and ignorance will cost you a fine and liability. Deliberate fraud and misuse of pesticides can put you in prison.

The appearance of any trade name in this newsletter is not intended to endorse that product
nor convey negative implications of unmentioned products.

Dear Readers:

The Georgia Pest Management Newsletter is a monthly journal for extension agents, extension specialists, and others interested in pest management news. It provides information on legislation, regulations, and other issues affecting pest management in Georgia.

Do not regard the information in this newsletter as pest management recommendations. Consult the Georgia Pest Management Handbook, other extension publications, or appropriate specialists for this information.

Your input in this newsletter is encouraged.

If you wish to be added to the mailing list, send an e-mail to tall@bugs.ent.uga.edu

Or write us:

Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

E-mail: mailto:bugman@uga.edu

Or visit us on the Web. You will find all the back issues there and other useful information.

http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/entomology/pestnewsletter/newsarchive.html

Sincerely:

Paul Guillebeau, Associate Professor & Extension Entomologist