Cooperative Extension Service
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Your source for pest management and pesticide news

December 2004/Volume 27, No. 12

It is sometimes difficult to believe that we have been doing this job for nearly 10 years
Based our experience, here are the most valuable tips to reduce your risks from pesticides
An unidentified thief stole an agricultural spray plane in Mexico near the US/Mexico border

NEWS YOU CAN USE

If you have ideas but no money, check out the USDA-CSREES call for proposals
The EPA is trying to help growers battle soybean rust by making new pesticides available

FQPA AND REREGISTRATION

The EPA has released an amendment to the 1999 Reregistration Eligibility Document (RED) for captan
Bayer CropSciences is voluntarily deleting all agricultural uses from the DiSyson 15G label except Fraser firs in North Carolina and coffee trees in Puerto Rico
The risk assessments, preliminary risk reduction options, and related documents are available for the ethylenebisdithiocarbamate (EBDC) pesticides mancozeb, maneb, and metiram, and a common degradate, ethylene thiourea

FEDERAL NEWS

Everyone agrees that the protection of children’s health is a primary goal of pesticide regulation

IPM IN SCHOOLS

A recent study of childcare providers in California provided some promising news and some disturbing news about chemical risks at childcare facilities


It is sometimes difficult to believe that we have been doing this job for nearly 10 years. The newsletter has grown from an irregularly published note to a monthly journal with about 1500 subscribers. Additionally, many more people read parts or all of the newsletter from the Internet. Thanks for your support. We hope we continue to provide useful information. If you have suggestions for improvement, please let us know. (bugman@uga.edu)

Based our experience, here are the most valuable tips to reduce your risks from pesticides.

If you were looking for revelations, you may have been disappointed. Minimizing pesticide risks is simple. My doctor told me the same thing about losing weight and lowering my blood pressure. He only had two rules; don’t eat so $#@# much and get off of your big fat backside more. Following his advice, I only eat a single item for dinner. You don’t have to cut up a large pizza or a whole chicken to eat it.

An unidentified thief stole an agricultural spray plane in Mexico near the US/Mexico border. The aircraft is registered in Mexico (Tail Number XBCYP), and there has been no indication that the craft entered the United States. Additionally, there have reports of a man making suspicious enquiries about purchasing large quantities of fertilizer that could be used to make a bomb. These incidents are good reminders that terrorists could use agricultural chemicals and equipment.

Review your plan for securing your chemicals and application equipment, particularly aircraft. Report suspicious activity promptly to local law enforcement or the Transportation Security Administration at 866/GA-SECUR (866-427-3287).

News You Can Use

If you have ideas but no money, check out the USDA-CSREES call for proposals. There are several programs available that cover a variety of interests. Note the deadlines. All of the programs are described at http://www.csrees.usda.gov/fo/funding.cfm

Integrated Research, Education, and Extension Competitive Grants Program (Crops at Risk, Risk Avoidance and Mitigation, and Methyl Bromide).

The contacts for these programs are:

Applications must be received by CSREES by March 7, 2005.

Integrated Organic Program. Page 3.

The deadline is May 2, 2005.

Pest Management Alternatives Program. Page 4.

The deadline is February 28, 2005.

Do not let the glitch on the opening page scare you away. The range of awards is indicated as $0.00 to $0.00. However, you could fund a lot of projects for that price.

The EPA is trying to help growers battle soybean rust by making new pesticides available. The latest tool is pyraclostrobin. It is number eleven in the arsenal of pesticides available against soybean rust. This entire list is available here. http://www.epa.gov/oppfead1/cb/csb_page/updates/soybean_rust.htm

If you need more information about soybean rust, visit this website. http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/issues/sbr/sbr.html

FQPA and Reregistration

The EPA has released an amendment to the 1999 Reregistration Eligibility Document (RED) for captan; the comment period closes January 24, 2005. The amendment makes minor changes to the original RED, and EPA changed the cancer classification for captan.

Captan has been registered for more than 40 years. The fungicide is used to control diseases in orchard crops, ornamentals, and turf. It is also used as a seed treatment and as a preservative in paints and adhesives. Captan is a serious eye irritant. Until recently, EPA classified captan as a probable human carcinogen.

The modifications in the amendment strengthen the protections for workers regarding eye irritation, change restricted entry intervals, and change some uses. The amendment calls for oral and written warnings to workers for all agricultural uses of captan, and verbal notification of eye concerns associated with captan for 7 days following application. Wettable powders applied aerially must be formulated in water-soluble packages. The use rate for dichondra ornamental grass is reduced. A re-entry interval of 48 hours is established for ornamentals, blackberries, blueberries, dewberries, raspberries, and grapes. The requirement for dust/mist respirator requirement for handling bags of treated seed is removed.

Based on data submitted by the captan task force, a panel of experts outside of EPA concluded that captan acted through a non-gentoxic threshold mode of action. Genotoxins directly affect DNA; they are considered to be more potent carcinogens. The Agency concluded that captan is only a potential human carcinogen at an exposure threshold significantly greater than likely dietary or nondietary exposure. In other words, the EPA concluded that labeled uses of captan are unlikely to cause human cancers. (EPA Pesticide Program Update, 12-9-04)

Unfortunately, most people will still be uncomfortable with “unlikely to cause human cancers,” and truth is that current knowledge does not allow us to state the risks more precisely.

Bayer CropSciences is voluntarily deleting all agricultural uses from the DiSyson 15G label except Fraser firs in North Carolina and coffee trees in Puerto Rico. The company decided to delete these uses instead of developing exposure monitoring data to support the reregistration decision. The product is currently registered on beans, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, coffee trees, cotton, peanuts, peppers, radish grown for seed, clover grown for seed, and Christmas trees. http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/2004/December/Day-15/p27366.htm

The risk assessments, preliminary risk reduction options, and related documents are available for the ethylenebisdithiocarbamate (EBDC) pesticides mancozeb, maneb, and metiram, and a common degradate, ethylene thiourea (ETU). The public is encouraged to comment on the risk assessments and suggest risk management ideas or proposals to address the risks identified. Applicators who use these fungicides should pay particular attention to the preliminary risk reduction options. Some of the options may make the chemicals impractical for certain uses.

The EBDCs are broad-spectrum fungicides used on agricultural crops (vegetables, fruits, and nuts), turf (golf courses and sod farms), and ornamentals (such as cut flowers). The risk concerns include residential and recreational exposures, dietary exposure, and occupational exposures. The EBDCs also pose acute ecological risks to aquatic ecosystems and chronic risks to birds and mammals.

The 90-day comment period ends February 22, 2005. During the comment period, the Agency plans to hold a stakeholder meeting to present and discuss EBDC risks and possible risk management options. The EPA plans to complete Reregistration Eligibility Decisions (REDs) for mancozeb, maneb, and metiram in September 2005.

Additional information is available at the EPA website. http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/2004/November/Day-24/p26132.htm

Federal News

Everyone agrees that the protection of children’s health is a primary goal of pesticide regulation. The problem has been difficulty in determining and measuring the risks. To address this problem, EPA initiated the Children’s Health Environmental Exposure Risk Study (CHEERS). It is not a study of the top party schools. The two-year study will collect information about families who volunteered to participate in the project. The data will include household pesticide use and potential exposure for children up to three years old. The participating families will be asked not to change their normal routine of pesticide use (unless spraying their kids is the status quo). The scientists will collect samples of food from the homes and urine samples from the children. The information will be used to estimate the children’s exposure to pesticides and phthalates. Phthalates are chemicals commonly used to make plastics; there is some concern that phthalates can interfere with human hormones.

At the request of EPA, the Batelle Memorial Institute, the University of North Carolina, the Duval County (Florida) Health Department, and the University of Florida reviewed the scientific merit of the study and the protection of human subjects. All of the institutions approved the study in 2004. The EPA has decided to send the project design out for another external, independent review by an expert panel made up of members of the Science Advisory Board, the Science Advisory Panel, and the Children's Health Protection Advisory Committee.

I applaud the Agency’s decision to seek additional external review. The results of this study could drive significant pesticide decisions. The risks to children may be greater or less than we currently think. It is imperative that the design of this study be above criticism by groups that are either pro- or anti- pesticide.

You will find more information about CHEERS at this address. http://www.epa.gov/cheers/basic.htm You cannot volunteer to participate unless you live in the Florida study area. They may have all of the volunteers they need anyway.

IPM in Schools

A recent study of childcare providers in California provided some promising news and some disturbing news about chemical risks at childcare facilities. The good news was that 80 percent of the 750 respondents wanted information about reducing chemical risks around their facility. Nearly every childcare provider wants to maintain a healthy environment for children.

Unfortunately, many childcare providers do not know how to minimize chemical risks. Less than 3% of the respondents had any training in management of pesticides, lead, or indoor air quality in the last two years. More than 80 percent of the providers were involved in pest management decisions, but less than 1 percent had any formal training in the last two years. More than 85 percent of the facilities presented one or more asthma triggers; 42 percent said they have children or staff that suffer from asthma or persistent respiratory illness. The report is available at http://www.greenchildcare.org/

This report makes me feel more concerned about chemical risks in childcare facilities in other states. If you would like to cooperate on this kind of project, contact me (bugman@uga.edu).

The appearance of any trade name in this newsletter is not intended to endorse that product
nor convey negative implications of unmentioned products.

Dear Readers:

The Georgia Pest Management Newsletter is a monthly journal for extension agents, extension specialists, and others interested in pest management news. It provides information on legislation, regulations, and other issues affecting pest management in Georgia.

Do not regard the information in this newsletter as pest management recommendations. Consult the Georgia Pest Management Handbook, other extension publications, or appropriate specialists for this information.

Your input in this newsletter is encouraged.

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Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

E-mail: mailto:bugman@uga.edu

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http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/entomology/pestnewsletter/newsarchive.html

Sincerely:

Paul Guillebeau, Associate Professor and Extension Entomologist