Cooperative Extension Service
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Your source for pest management and pesticide news

October 2004/Volume 27, No. 10

Here are the responses to our query regarding 2004 butterfly populations in Georgia
According to Ripley’s Believe It or Not, you are almost always within 3 feet of a spider

NEWS YOU CAN USE

Bibb, Bleckley , Dodge, Hall, Houston, Monroe, Peach, and Twiggs counties are sponsoring several recertification opportunities for certified pesticide applicators
Georgia growers can use Asana XL on turnip greens under a newly approved Special Local Need (24C) label

FQPA AND REREGISTRATION

Things are beginning to move again on FQPA
The EPA has concerns about carbaryl use around the home
It is the end of the line for retail sale of existing diazinon stocks labeled for indoor uses
The EPA published a final rule to revoke the 110 tolerances for allethrin, bendiocarb, molinate, Burkholderia cepacia (a biological pesticide), and fenridazon potassium (a plant growth regulator)

FEDERAL NEWS

Here are the latest statistics regarding pesticide use in the United States
The EPA plans to revise the process for pesticide emergency exemptions

BIOTECHNOLOGY

The EPA conditionally registered a new Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) cotton from Dow AgroSciences called Wide Strike




Here are the responses to our query regarding 2004 butterfly populations in Georgia.

From my observation, it seems as though there is a decline in the number and types of butterflies this year. I have planted several species of plants to attract them, and have seen very few. Most that are being spotted are whites and sulphurs. I have seen only one or two swallowtail species, and very few gossamer wing species. What I have not seen that got my curiosity up was the lack of monarch butterflies. Is there an environmental issue, or life cycle differential that has caused this?

I planted several butterfly bushes around my yard ( Gwinnett County ) two years ago. I was really pleased in the summer of 2003 to see so many skippers, swallow tails, fritillaries and microlepidops around the bushes. (I am a forest entomologist, by the way.) This past summer, I doubt that I saw 25 percent of the number. I have heard causes such as the amount of rain and other weather related causes. Not sure about that, but the number of "flutterbies" definitely seemed much reduced.

Monarchs - fewer than I remember in the past
Sulphers - more than I remember in the past
Gulf Fritillary - much more plentiful than past, the caterpillars are defoliating a large Passiflora incarnata vine currently.
All Swallowtails - about the same

Did not see as many swallowtails, monarchs, bigger butterflies this year. Population appeared to be depressed.

From the small number of responses, it is not possible to reach a definite conclusion. We also had several callers that remarked about fewer butterflies.

Maybe next year, we can recruit many more butterfly watchers and collect some meaningful data.

According to Ripley’s Believe It or Not, you are almost always within 3 feet of a spider. Use that tidbit wisely. If you are unmarried, you might use the information to make your honey snuggle just a little bit closer. After you marry, the same information could cost you thousands of dollars to have your house fumigated.

News You Can Use

Bibb, Bleckley, Dodge, Hall, Houston, Monroe, Peach, and Twiggs counties are sponsoring several recertification opportunities for certified pesticide applicators. Applicators in any nonstructural category can receive two hours of credit per session.

Location:

Georgia Farm Bureau Headquarters
1620 Bass Rd., Macon
Dining Hall (5th floor)

Dates:

November 19

10a.m.-12 p.m.

1:30-3:30 p.m.

December 10

10a.m.-12 p.m.

1:30-3:30 p.m.

The sessions are $5 ($7 at the door), and you need to pre-register. Classes will be canceled if there are not enough people. You can get the details by phone or e-mail

Phone: 478.751.6338
e-mail: uge2021@uga.edu

Georgia growers can use Asana XL on turnip greens under a newly approved Special Local Need (24C) label.

If growers in other states have a similar need, they should ask their state pesticide regulators for assistance. Your state can probably get a comparable label.

FQPA and Reregistration

Things are beginning to move again on FQPA. The FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel will review the data supporting the risk assessment for carbaryl (Sevin). The panel will also consider the cumulative risk assessment for the carbamates.  (EPA Pesticide Program Update, 10-29-04)

Both meetings (December 2-3) are open for public attendance and comment. You will find more information at http://www.epa.gov/scipoly/sap

Usually, EPA and other federal agencies enter a holding pattern around the Presidential election. If the Democrats had won the White House, the administrator of EPA would have changed, along with EPA priorities and guiding policies. Now that EPA knows what to expect for the next four years, they will get back to business.

The EPA has concerns about carbaryl use around the home. Carbaryl products are among the most widely used household insecticides, particularly with the elimination of chlorpyrifos and diazinon products sold for home use.

The Agency and the registrants are taking steps to mitigate household risks. All pet uses (except flea collars) of carbaryl are being cancelled. The registrants are also changing concentration, packaging, and size of household products. The Agency is also concerned about post-application risks to toddlers from the broadcast use of liquid carbaryl on lawns. The registrants agreed not to produce new technical products labeled for that use until EPA considered data being developed to refine the Agency's risk assessment.

For those of you unfamiliar with technical jargon of pesticide application, here is a belly grinder. You probably thought it was something dirty.

It is the end of the line for retail sale of existing diazinon stocks labeled for indoor uses. Retail sale of existing stocks of Diazinon products labeled for indoor uses (except mushroom houses) is not allowed after December 31, 2004. The EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs has mailed out a notice to 40,000 retailers.

The EPA published a final rule to revoke the 110 tolerances for allethrin, bendiocarb, molinate, Burkholderia cepacia (a biological pesticide), and fenridazon potassium (a plant growth regulator). These revocations are not cause for alarm. All of the associated food uses were already canceled at the request of the registrants. (EPA Pesticide Program Update, 10-15-04)

Federal News

Here are the latest statistics regarding pesticide use in the United States. The EPA’s latest pesticide report includes pesticide sales and usage in 2000-2001. The report includes information about agricultural and nonagricultural pesticide use. It also tracks historical use over the last 20 years. Here are some interesting facts to liven up your next dinner party.

You can read the entire report at http://www.epa.gov/oppbead1/pestsales/index.htm

Be careful how you use this information. Although it is difficult to believe, some people are not interested in pesticides around the dinner table.

When you think about the application of nearly 1 billion pounds of pesticides each year in the United States, it makes you wonder how there could be any pests left.

The EPA plans to revise the process for pesticide emergency exemptions (Section 18). The Section 18 exemption allows the use of unregistered pesticides in emergence situations. A Section 18 could be granted to farmers whose crops are threatened by a pest that cannot be controlled with pesticides registered for that crop.

The proposed revisions include:

  1. the general use of a re-certification application rather than a normal application in the second and third years for certain repeat requests. In many cases, a Section 18 is granted for the same use several years in a row. This revision would make the repeat application easier.
  2. use of a loss-based approach to substantiate a "significant economic loss" (the most commonly used criterion for demonstrating an emergency condition) rather than a comparison of revenues under the emergency to historical variations in revenues. EPA has historically granted a Section 18 based on the projected loss compared with the revenues from the past 5 years. An exemption could be denied if the projected losses fell within the variation experienced over the past 5 years.

Biotechnology

The EPA conditionally registered a new Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) cotton from Dow AgroSciences called Wide Strike. The new cotton contains Bt Cry1Ac protein and a Cry1F protein, both previously approved by the Agency. These proteins have activity against tobacco budworm, pink bollworm, cotton bollworm, cabbage looper, saltmarsh caterpillar, cotton leaf perforator, soybean looper, beet armyworm, fall armyworm, yellowstriped armyworm and European corn borer. The conditional registration permits sale and use of Wide Strike until September 30, 2009. (EPA Pesticide Program Update, 10-12-04)

The appearance of any trade name in this newsletter is not intended to endorse that product
nor convey negative implications of unmentioned products.

Dear Readers:

The Georgia Pest Management Newsletter is a monthly journal for extension agents, extension specialists, and others interested in pest management news. It provides information on legislation, regulations, and other issues affecting pest management in Georgia .

Do not regard the information in this newsletter as pest management recommendations. Consult the Georgia Pest Management Handbook, other extension publications, or appropriate specialists for this information.

Your input in this newsletter is encouraged.

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Or write us:

Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

e-mail: bugman@uga.edu

Or visit us on the Web. You will find all the back issues there and other useful information.

http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/entomology/pestnewsletter/newsarchive.html

Sincerely:

Paul Guillebeau, Associate Professor & Extension Entomologist