Cooperative Extension Service
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Your Source for Pest Management and Pesticide News

September, 2002/Volume 25, No. 9

HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Some media coverage portrays West Nile virus as the fourth horseman of the Apocalypse, but the virus actually threatens very few people
The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and The Coleman Company announced the recall of 136,000 Mosquito DeletoTM Traps
Soybean rust is a serious plant disease in many parts of the world; it is expected to find its way to the United States
The Georgia Clean Day program recently collected more than 86,000 pounds of unwanted pesticides from the Bartow County area

FOOD QUALITY PROTECTION ACT -- REREGISTRATION

The EPA is asking for comments on the preliminary risk assessment for carbaryl
The EPA has asked a Scientific Advisory Panel to review a proposed method that uses historical pesticide usage data to estimate the percentage of the current crop being treated

FREE MONEY

The USDA IR-4 program helps minor crops and minor uses obtain the pesticides they need
Farmers, ranchers , researchers, community organizations, environmentalists, ag and community development professionals, entrepreneurs, and governmental and non-governmental organizations are eligible for Sustainable Community Innovation Grants

FEDERAL NEWS

It may not be necessary to obtain a pesticide food tolerance if the pesticide is undetectable
If your home is invaded with lady beetles, take part in this national study

NEWS YOU CAN USE

A low-dose herbicide seed coat successfully controls a devastating parasitic weed endemic to numerous crops across sub-Saharan Africa
This new book offers a current view of the discovery process for crop protection products: chemical, natural, and biotechnological
Is it better to introduce a single biocontrol agent or multiple species

CANCELLED

After December 31, 2002, retailers may no longer sell diazinon products for indoor uses

Health and the Environment

Some media coverage portrays West Nile virus as the fourth horseman of the Apocalypse, but the virus actually threatens very few people. West Nile virus can be a serious disease for the very old, very young, or people with an impaired immune system, but West Nile is not an important health risk for most people. However, the fear of West Nile virus can create other risks.

Beware of these hazards that may affect a wide range of people.

Miracle products. Whenever a public health scare occurs, companies seem to come out of the woodwork with new products. Doesn't it seem awfully coincidental that a new product just happens to be discovered when a health scare occurs? Beware of products that promise to eliminate mosquito populations in a short time or that operate through some kind of sonic repellency. 'Bug zappers' are not useful for controlling mosquitoes; no 'sonic' repellency device is effective against mosquitoes.

Companies that offer unnecessary services. You could write the ad yourself. "Don't put your family at risk from this deadly outbreak, call __________ Pest Control today."Some people may need professional help to control mosquitoes, but most people can implement an effective mosquito control program. See 'Keeping Pests Out of the Home with Fewer Pesticides & Using Pesticides Safely' at http://entomology.ent.uga.edu/ If you need help with a mosquito problem, interview several companies about their program and about the biology of mosquitoes. If the company does not seem knowledgeable, look for another company.

Excessive pesticide use. Many people follow two basic tenets of pest management: insecticides are the answer to all insect problems, and more is always better. Keep in mind that many pesticides also carry risks to human health and the environment. Think before you use any pesticide. Why is the insect a problem? Why is it attracted to your environment? If you cannot solve these root problems, pesticides may provide only temporary relief. Our web site, http://entomology.ent.uga.edu/ can help you solve many common insect problems. ALWAYS FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS ON THE PESTICIDE LABEL! Using more pesticide is not more effective and may cause unnecessary risks to your family or the environment.

Irresponsible use of repellents. For now, DEET is the most effective insect repellent sold. Many people do not realize that DEET is a pesticide, and it is absorbed through the skin. DEET products are valuable tools to protect your self from mosquitoes, but excessive use of DEET can also pose health risks. Young children are at the greatest risk. Protect Yourself Against Bites and Stings (http://entomology.ent.uga.edu/) will help you use repellents safely.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission and The Coleman Company announced the recall of 136,000 Mosquito DeletoTM Traps. These traps pose a fire hazard because the propane regulator may leak or allow an overflow of propane. In addition, the fuel hose attachment sold with the Back Home™ System leaks propane if it the attachment is damaged. No injuries have been reported, but Coleman has received 28 reports of traps melting or catching on fire as a result of propane leaking and 7 reports of damage to the propane fuel hoses.

The recalled Mosquito DeletoTM Traps were sold as a part of the Portable System and the Back HomeTM System. The traps are about 24 inches high, have a green or gray base and top, a black center, and attach to either a 1 lb. propane cylinder or a 20 lb. propane cylinder with a hose. The traps have two sets of model numbers: 2950-800 and 2950-801, which can be found on a label on the front of the trap above the words, "WARNING: For outdoor use only." The recalled Back Home™ System traps include a 5-foot rubber hose that connects to 20 lb. propane cylinders. The Portable System and Back Home SystemTM mosquito traps were manufactured in the United States.

Home centers, mass merchandisers, and hardware stores sold these products from March 2002 to July 2002 for between $170 and $200. The products were sold nationwide, except in California.

Consumers should stop using the mosquito traps and propane hoses immediately. Consumers should contact Coleman at (800) 257-5299 anytime, so that a representative can help determine whether their trap needs to be replaced, repaired, or can continue to be used. For more information, consumers can log on to the company's website at http://www.coleman.com/ (Thanks to Bob Bellinger)

Soybean rust is a serious plant disease in many parts of the world; it is expected to find its way to the United States. The disease is wind-borne, and it attacks soybeans and other legumes, including commercial varieties of beans and peas. This alert was issued to help us detect soybean rust as quickly as possible. With enough warning, we may be able to prevent establishment of the disease. Details can be found at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/ppq/ep/pestdetection/soybean_rust/soybeanrust.html

Ironically, soybean rust also attacks kudzu.

The Georgia Clean Day program recently collected more than 86,000 pounds of unwanted pesticides from the Bartow County area. In case you do not know, Georgia Clean Day is a cooperative effort between the Georgia Department of Agriculture and the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service. So far, the program has disposed of more than one million pounds of pesticide! Imagine where those pesticides would end up without this program. Congratulations and attaboys to Randy Drinkard (Bartow County Extension) and Steve Cole (Georgia Department of Agriculture) for a job well done. If you want to get more information about the Clean Day program http://www.agr.state.ga.us/html/pesticide_recycling.html

Talk to your county agent if you want to bring Georgia Clean Day to your area. Be patient. The Clean Day is limited by funding, but the program will come to you eventually. Remember it is not illegal for you to have canceled pesticides, but you are responsible for any damage they may cause. Store them securely.

Food Quality Protection Act -- Reregistration

The EPA is asking for comments on the preliminary risk assessment for carbaryl. A preliminary assessment is the Agency's first attempt to assess the risk. The EPA expects the comments to identify errors or omissions in the assessment. However, significant errors can remain if few people review the preliminary assessment. These errors may lead EPA to an improper decision. Take advantage of the comment period to give EPA the benefit of your experience and expertise.

EPA must receive comments by October 28, 2002. Please limit your comments to issues associated with carbaryl assessment. This is not the time or place to speculate about what Al Gore might have done. You can find more information at http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/reregistration/status.htm (EPA Pesticide Program Updates, 9-4-02)

The EPA has asked a Scientific Advisory Panel to review a proposed method that uses historical pesticide usage data to estimate the percentage of the current crop being treated. The percent-crop-treated is a basic parameter of many EPA risk assessments. The magnitude and the implications of pesticide risk change dramatically if you compare 5 percent crop treated with 80 percent crop treated.

Unfortunately, the Agency has no good way to measure percent-crop-treated in real time. Surveys by USDA and others survey pesticide applicators about past pesticide use practices. The EPA needs a reliable, defendable method to estimate current pesticide usage and to project future usage based on historical data.

The Scientific Advisory Panel will meet October 1. The public is also invited to submit comments. You will find more information at http://www.epa.gov/scipoly/sap/index.htm#october (EPA Pesticide Program Updates, 9-4-02)

Free Money

The USDA IR-4 program helps minor crops and minor uses obtain the pesticides they need. The IR-4 program is asking for grant proposals for their 2003 Biopesticide Research Program. You can find more information at http://pestdata.ncsu.edu/ir-4/Bindex.cfm?doc=docs/2003CallforProp.htm

Farmers, ranchers, researchers, community organizations, environmentalists, ag and community development professionals, entrepreneurs, and governmental and non-governmental organizations are eligible for Sustainable Community Innovation Grants. The grants are intended to strengthen both agriculture and rural communities by linking sustainable agriculture and community development.

DUE DATE: November 1, 2002.

This program is open to a wide range of ideas. A Georgia proposal from the Carroll County Farmland and Rural Preservation Committee introduces their traditional farm-based population to urban and suburban newcomers with a downtown farmers' market selling only locally grown produce. A Virginia Cooperative Extension project developed a farm tour that attracted 3,000 visitors to seven farms in 2001. Daviess County Extension Service in Kentucky will educate growers and consumers about the tasty edamame soybean that has the potential to generate $300 to $1800 per acre. In Immokalee, Florida, Harvest for Humanity is leading a project to find out if consumers are willing to pay slightly more for farm products if the label identifies the product as U.S. grown and picked by workers receiving a living wage.

Projects may be funded up to two years for a project maximum of $10,000. Individuals or organizations in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Puerto Rico or the US Virgin Islands are invited to submit proposals.

This web site offers more information http://www.southernsare.uga.edu/. If you prefer a hard copy, contact Gwen Roland at (770) 412-4787 or ppatton@griffin.uga.edu

Federal News

It may not be necessary to obtain a pesticide food tolerance if the pesticide is undetectable. The Office of Pesticide Programs has issued guidance (http://www.epa.gov/opppmsd1/PR_Notices/pr2002-2.pdf ) for pesticide registrants that produce food-use pesticides that may not need a tolerance (tolerance = the amount of a pesticide that can legally remain on a food crop).

According to current EPA policy, registrants may not need a tolerance or tolerance exemption if the pesticide meets two criteria. 1) Using a reliable and appropriately sensitive analytical method to measure residues in the commodity, no residues are detected in the commodity under expected conditions of use when the commodity enters interstate commerce, and 2) Using reasonably protective criteria, the estimated potential risk of any theoretically possible residues in food is not of concern. (U.S. EPA Update, 9-3-02)

If your home is invaded with lady beetles, take part in this national study. The Multicolored Asian Lady Beetle (MALB) Watch web site http://www.pmcenters.org/northcentral/MALB/ allows individuals who are being invaded by this insect to submit a report of the problem via this web site. Researchers will use this information to develop new methods to approach the overwintering habits of the MALB and to evaluate MALB distribution/density as a result of the introduction of the soybean aphid as a new food source. Field observations indicate MALB populations are high in soybean fields where the soybean aphids are located. Many of the calls I have taken were not located near soybean fields, but the data may still help alleviate the problem of lady beetle invasion.

The project sounds very interesting. By visiting the web site, you can compare your lady beetle problems with other counties in Georgia and other states. The web site also has links to other information about the lady beetles and tips for dealing with invasions.

News You Can Use

A low-dose herbicide seed coat successfully controls a devastating parasitic weed endemic to numerous crops across sub-Saharan Africa. Witchweed is a parasitic plant that attacks maize and other important food crops. The weed attaches to the host roots and sucks out the nutrients.

Scientists have developed maize varieties that are resistant to the herbicide imazapyr. When imazapyr is used to coat the maize seed (at 1/10 the usual field rate), the witchweed is prevented from attaching. Additionally, any imazapyr not immediately absorbed by the maize or the weed diffuses into the surrounding soil and kills ungerminated witchweed seed. By the time the crop ripens, the herbicide, applied in this way at less than one-tenth the normal rate, has disappeared, leaving the food product unaffected. If you want to know more, visit the web site. http://www.cimmyt.org/Research/Maize/results/striga/control.htm OK, I guess you can't use that news unless you plan to relocate, but it is still interesting. (IPMnet News, September 2002)

This new book offers a current view of the discovery process for crop protection products: chemical, natural, and biotechnological. I have not read Agrochemical Discovery - Insect, Weed, and Fungal Control (edited by D.R. Baker and N.K. Umetsu), but I think I will. You can supposedly find this 317 page book at http://www.oup-usa.org/, but I gave up before I found it. [Note: Web person did search of site using the words "Agrochemical Discovery" and pulled up a listing for the book. There's a listing of the table of contents, but I did not see the entire book.]

Is it better to introduce a single biocontrol agent or multiple species? A recently published analysis of 167 biocontrol projects found that introducing multiple agents increased success against weeds but reduced efficacy against insect pests. Denoth et al. report that the results of their study "suggest that negative interactions may play a significant role amongst biological control agents of insects." In more than half the multi-biocontrol-agent projects surveyed, a single agent was shown to be responsible for a successful outcome. The authors, based on their findings, recommend that the procedure of inserting multiple agents, not for cumulative effect, but to increase the likelihood of finding an effective species, should be used with restraint for pest insects. You can read their paper, "Multiple Agents in Biological Control: Improving the Odds?," in Biological Control (May 2002). (IPMnet News, 9-02)

Cancelled

After December 31, 2002, retailers may no longer sell diazinon products for indoor uses. Indoor uses include "All uses inside any structure, vehicle, vessel, aircraft, or enclosed area and/or on any contents therein (except mushroom houses), including residences, food/feed handling establishments, schools, museums, stores, hospitals, sports facilities, warehouses, and greenhouses. All indoor uses for pets including pet collars."

All outdoor, non-ag uses are being canceled as well, including products for home lawns, gardens, and any other outdoor residential use. The stop sale date for these products is August 31, 2003. (Thanks to Adams Technology Systems for this reminder)

The appearance of any trade name in this newsletter is not intended to endorse
that product nor convey negative implications of unmentioned products.

Dear Readers:

The Georgia Pest Management Newsletter is a monthly journal for extension agents, extension specialists, and others interested in pest management news. It provides information on legislation, regulations, and other issues affecting pest management in Georgia.

Do not regard the information in this newsletter as pest management recommendations. Consult the Georgia Pest Control Handbook, other extension publications, or appropriate specialists for this information.

Your input in this newsletter is encouraged.

If you wish to be added to the mailing list, just call us at 706-542-2816

Or write us:
Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602
E-mail: pguillebeau@bugs.ent.uga.edu

Or visit us on the Web. You will find all the back issues there and other useful information. http://www.ces.uga.edu/Agriculture/entomology/pestnewsletter/newsarchive.html

Sincerely:


Dr. Paul Guillebeau, Associate Professor & Extension Entomologist