Cooperative Extension Service
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Your source for pest management and pesticide news

September 2004/Volume 27, No. 9

Several calls to my colleagues and me make us wonder about butterfly populations in Georgia this year
When you consider the risks of dangerous weather, do you think about pesticides?
If you are contacted by Georgia Agricultural Statistics Service (GASS), please cooperate

HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

You just think your life is hard until grasshoppers begin to attack your car
We regularly receive calls from people reporting bites or irritation from “invisible” insects

NEWS YOU CAN USE

The next Georgia Clean Day will be held at Lowe’s on Windward Parkway ) in North Alpharetta on October 19
Here are two stories about the cost of integrated pest management
Georgia strawberry growers can use Stinger herbicide under a new special local need pesticide registration

FEDERAL NEWS

The EPA has signed the final rule that changes glove requirements of the Worker Protection Standard
The EPA is asking for comments regarding proposed changes to the Pesticide Emergency Exemption (Section 18) process
The EPA is considering how to implement an international system for pesticide labeling

BIOTECHNOLOGY

How would you feel about scientists fooling around with the morning cup o’ coffee?

OTHER NEWS

Last month, we asked you to send stories of unusual ways to control insects; here are the top two stories
Here is an interesting website with information about the effects that insects have had on world history
$$
The IR-4 Biopesticide Research Program announces a request for grant proposals for funding of efficacy research in 2005
Academic institutions, non-profit organizations, state, local, and tribal governments are eligible to receive grants in the EPA "Building Health Professional Capacity To Address Children's Environmental Health" program


 

Several calls to my colleagues and me make us wonder about butterfly populations in Georgia this year. Please let us know if you think numbers and variety of butterflies have been different this year. bugman@uga.edu

When you consider the risks of dangerous weather, do you think about pesticides? Floods, high winds, and other dangerous weather can increase the risks of pesticide exposure for man and the environment. Clemson University has some excellent advice. http://entweb.clemson.edu/pesticid/saftyed/storage.htm#Storms

Thanks to Dr. Bob Bellinger.

If you are contacted by Georgia Agricultural Statistics Service (GASS), please cooperate. GASS and their national counterpart (NASS) collect information about crop production and pesticide use. Government agencies use the information to evaluate pesticide use and needs of targeted commodities. This year’s targets are vegetables.

Some people simply do not cooperate with surveys or government agencies as a matter of principle. They would be making a mistake in this instance. Incomplete or incorrect information does not stop decisions from being made. Poor information will always result in poor decisions.

For example, if EPA does not know how much of a pesticide is actually used, the risk estimates may be based on the assumption that every grower uses the pesticide on every acre at the maximum allowable rate. The assumption is not true in most cases and will greatly inflate the risk estimates.

Health and the Environment

You just think your life is hard until grasshoppers begin to attack your car. A county extension agent reported that these insects were coming from a nearby hay field and chewing up the rubber on these cars. This picture represent some people’s worst nightmare.

The county extension agent was the first person that many people called. We may take extension for granted, but people expect us to know everything about everything.

Imagine trying to explain this damage to your insurance company.

We regularly receive calls from people reporting bites or irritation from “invisible” insects. In some cases, we are able to identify an arthropod culprit that is not invisible but may be hard to detect. In other situations, we help the caller identify a non-arthropod cause for the irritation (e.g., insulation or a new laundry soap).

However, we are not able to solve every case; sometimes the answer is delusory parasitosis. The person thinks that a parasite is causing his or her problem. Medications, skin irritants, diseases, and other factors can cause delusory parasitosis. You can read an excellent article here: http://www.ent.uga.edu/publications/delusory.pdf

A new discovery may help us solve additional cases. In an Oklahoma research project, doctors discovered collembolans in 18 of 20 patients that had been diagnosed with delusory parasitosis. Collembolans, or springtails, are tiny insects that live in the soil. You can read the entire article here http://www.headlice.org/report/research/jnyes.pdf

News You Can Use

The next Georgia Clean Day will be held at Lowe’s on Windward Parkway in North Alpharetta on October 19. The program is free to all participants and has collected about 1.5 million pounds of pesticides since 1995. For more information, contact Terry Porter at tporter@alpharetta.ga.us or (678) 297-6200. You do not have to live in Alpharetta to participate, but you must register.

Georgia Clean Day helps people safely dispose of unwanted pesticides. The program cannot accept compressed gases, solvents, paints, antifreeze, motor oil, explosive materials, or fertilizers/nutrients that do not contain pesticides.

Here are two stories about the cost of integrated pest management (IPM). An IPM program reduces pesticide risks by substituting other methods (e.g., sanitation and maintenance) for pesticides. Entomologists and others promote IPM as the best way to manage pests and minimize risks. The audience always wants to know, “How much does it cost?” Leave it to laymen to spoil a perfectly good IPM speech by asking dumb questions. Anyway, here are two answers to the IPM cost question.

The school district in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, received a national IPM award. According to the press release, the school system reduced their pesticide costs from $46,000 to $14,000 in one year. Of the pest-related work orders in 2003, 65 percent (265 orders) were resolved through non-chemical methods. The article did not say if the IPM program cost the school system more money. I am trying to find out. 

In another report from Pesticide & Toxic Chemical News Daily (7-26-04), a study of German cockroaches in public housing indicated that IPM was more effective, but more expensive, than a traditional monthly spray program.

Researchers chose 100 housing units with demonstrated cockroach infestations. Half of the units received sprayed liquid and dust formulation pesticide applications as per conventional baseboard, crack and crevice practice, with the liquid being re-sprayed monthly and the dust replaced as needed. The other units were treated with IPM eradication methods such as HEPA filter vacuuming of infestation sites, baits and insect growth regulators, with monthly or quarterly IGR replacement, as needed. Residents in all units were asked not to modify their household sanitation habits during the course of the study.

Researchers expected to find that the pest control methods would show equal efficacy, despite chemical applications costing less than IPM. Although IPM did prove to be more costly, the difference in efficacy was pronounced.

In this study, IPM costs might have been reduced if residents were asked to improve household sanitation. However, it would have made the experiment much more difficult.

Georgia strawberry growers can use Stinger herbicide under a new special local need pesticide registration.  Look for the new labeling at your local dealer. Contact Steve Cole (scole@agr.state.ga.us) or 404-656-4958 for more information.

Federal News

The EPA has signed the final rule that changes glove requirements of the Worker Protection Standard.

(1) All agricultural employees (harvesters, cultivators, pesticide handlers) are permitted to wear separable glove liners beneath chemical-resistant gloves; and Workers may choose when to wear the liners. The liners may not be longer than the chemical-resistant glove and they may not extend outside the glove. The liners must be disposed of after 10 hours of use, or whenever the liners become contaminated.

Lined or flocked gloves, where the lining is attached to the inside of the chemical resistant outer glove, remain unacceptable. Regulatory action was taken to reduce the discomfort of unlined chemical resistant gloves, especially during hot or cold periods.

(2) Agricultural pilots do not have to wear chemical-resistant gloves when entering or exiting aircraft.

Additionally, chemically resistant gloves do not add any appreciable protection against minimal pesticide residues found around the cockpit of an aircraft.

The Worker Protection Standard applies to production operations in forestry, nursery, greenhouse, and row crops. If you are not sure if you should be following WPS, check it out http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/health/worker.htm. The cost of not following the rules can be expensive.

The EPA is asking for comments regarding proposed changes to the Pesticide Emergency Exemption (Section 18) process. The revisions would allow applicants for emergency exemptions (state and federal agencies) to use a re-certification application rather than a normal application in the second and third years for certain repeat requests, and use a loss-based approach to substantiate a "significant economic loss" (the most commonly used criterion for demonstrating an emergency condition) rather than a comparison of revenues under the emergency to historical variations in revenues.

Both of these proposed revisions are currently being evaluated in a limited pilot program. The Federal Register notice will be published on September 3, 2004, and the comment deadline is November 3, 2004. The revisions would reduce the burden to applicants and EPA, allow for quicker decisions by EPA, and provide more consistent and fairer determinations of "significant economic loss" as the basis for an emergency. The proposed revisions would not compromise protection of human health or the environment, as the risk side of the assessment and exemption decision is not affected.

An Emergency Exemption (Section 18) allows the use of an unregistered pesticide. The Agency reviews each application to see if it fulfills the criteria for an “emergency” and to ensure that the pesticide application will not cause unreasonable risks.

For additional information please contact Joseph Hogue by phone at 703.308.9072, or by e-mail at hogue.joe@epa.gov Tell him that Paul Guillebeau sent you.

The EPA is considering how to implement an international system for pesticide labeling. Called the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, or GHS, the new system sets out criteria for classifying chemical hazards and communicating those hazards on labels and safety data sheets. Countries have traditionally used different systems for informing workers and consumers about physical, health, and/or environmental hazards associated with the use of chemicals. More uniform and harmonized labels will improve communication regarding chemical safety for consumers and workers, and reduce barriers for companies engaged in international trade. After working for more than a decade with national and international partners and stakeholders to create a globally harmonized system, EPA and other agencies in the United States that regulate chemicals are preparing for adoption of the new classification criteria and label elements.

The Agency is particularly interested in receiving feedback on the following:

  1. regulations that may warrant review or possible revision;
  2. the use of a pilot project before the final rules are in place;
  3. the timing and sequence of implementation;
  4. coordination of implementation planning efforts with other groups to make the process more efficient;
  5. and recommendations for outreach and education activities.

EPA recognizes that significant effort and time may be required to implement the GHS label changes and conduct effective outreach and education activities. EPA foresees this process occurring in multiple stages over several years. The comment period began Aug. 25 and closes October 25. The white paper and a side-by-side comparison of the GHS with EPA's current pesticide labeling policies are available for review and comment on EPA's Web site at: http://cfpub.epa.gov/pesticides/comments.cfm

Biotechnology

How would you feel about scientists fooling around with the morning cup o’ coffee? Brazilian scientists have identified 35,000 coffee genes. After you have had your first cup of coffee, you will remember that the combination of genes gives coffee its aroma, flavor, and jolt. Genes also influence an organism’s susceptibility to disease, cold, and other environmental factors.

The Agriculture Minister of Brazil said that Brazil would develop a super-coffee with better taste/aroma and greater disease resistance. Brazil is already the world’s largest coffee producer. The genetic information will be available to Brazilian companies in five or six years. Brazil has not decided when or how to share the information with other countries.

Would you feel better if the super-coffee were developed by traditional plant breeding instead of direct genetic manipulation? Brazil plans to manipulate genes in coffee crops through more natural measures like directed cross-pollination. Brazil is one of the few agricultural producers that prohibits production and sale of crops produced through direct genetic engineering.

Read the details during your coffee break at http://www.ncausa.org/public/pages/headlinedetails.cfm?id=266&returnto=1

Other News

Last month, we asked you to send stories of unusual ways to control insects; here are the top two stories.

David Cleveland wrote, “I've heard that the old timers had a very effective method of keeping the gnats out of their face down here in South Georgia . They would wear the type of overalls that had the rear opening and would leave the flap down while they worked. I've heard that it was quite effective. Maybe the young boys that wear their pants down past their drawers today are having gnat problems too.”

A friend of mine said you could draw gnats away from your face by leaving your fly undone.

If you want to try these gnat ideas, either experiment privately or make sure people understand that you are conducting scientific research.

With tongue firmly in cheek, Walter Reeves sent us this fire ant control. DON’T DO THIS! It is dangerous, and it is not likely to be effective.

Here is an interesting website with information about the effects that insects have had on world history. If a war is not bad enough, imagine trying to serve while battling mosquitoes, biting flies, and insect-borne diseases. http://scarab.msu.montana.edu/historybug/

$$

The IR-4 Biopesticide Research Program announces a request for grant proposals for funding of efficacy research in 2005. With newer targeted conventional chemicals, there is interest in resistance management to maintain the utility of those products. Therefore, IR-4 is especially interested in proposals containing biopesticides as resistance management tools, rotated with conventional products. While resistance management is an important interest, the proposal must still have a majority focus on biopesticides. Selection of treatments and experimental design should be considered to elucidate the contribution of each component to the pest control system. New for 2005, project proposals will be accepted in three different stage categories. The three project stages are Early, Advanced, and Demonstration. The amount of funding available will be around $400,000. Most successful grants have generally ranged from $5,000 to $10,000 with the largest grants generally around $20,000. In 2004, the success rate for the different grant stages ranged from 20 to 62 percent.

The primary objective of the IR-4 BiopesticidesResearch Program is to further the development and registration of biopesticides for use in pest management systems for specialty crops or for minor uses on major crops. Please note that the three project stages (Early, Advanced, and Demonstration) have specific proposal forms. If you are submitting a proposal for the Early or Advanced stage project, please use the forms on pages 10-20 of the Grant Procedure and Application. If you are submitting a proposal for a Demonstration project, please use the forms on pages 21-27. The entire 2005 IR-4 BiopesticideGrant Procedure and Application Form can be found at http://www.ir4.rutgers.edu/docs/2005CallforProposals.htm

Academic institutions, non-profit organizations, state, local, and tribal governments are eligible to receive grants in the EPA "Building Health Professional Capacity To Address Children's Environmental Health" program (letters of intent due by October 25). The Agency needs competitive projects that increase the number of health professionals who are able to address the broad spectrum of children's environmental health issues in their practices, in the institutions in which they work, in their communities, and in academic settings. This solicitation focuses on developing multi-state (at least five states), national, or international (at least three countries) training/education programs for health professionals.

These programs will help health professionals understand, diagnose, and develop prevention messages for the full spectrum of children's environmental health issues they encounter. Children's environmental health hazards may include: (1) air pollutants, both indoor and ambient; (2) toxic chemicals such as lead, mercury, arsenic, organochlorines such as polychlorinated biphenyls and dioxins; (3) endocrine disruptors; (4) environmental tobacco smoke; (5) ultraviolet radiation; (6) water pollution; (7) pesticides; (8) brominated flame retardants; (9) radon; and (10) carbon monoxide.

Training should assist health professionals increase understanding of environmental health issues among their patients and their communities, helping them understand the key role of exposure prevention in averting environmentally-related illness and disease. Each proposal must include an evaluation methodology to measure the effectiveness of the training and training approach in fostering the incorporation of children's environmental health issues into the practices of health professionals.

Funds available for these projects are expected to total approximately $300,000. Grants are requested for a total of $100,000 to $150,000 for a two-year performance period. Questions may be directed by e-mail only to Blackburn.Elizabeth@EPA.gov -- EPA will not respond to questions by phone or fax -- Information about the EPA Office of Children's Health Protection is here http://yosemite.epa.gov/ochp/ochpweb.nsf/homepage

The appearance of any trade name in this newsletter is not intended to endorse that product nor convey negative implications of unmentioned products.

Dear Readers:

The Georgia Pest Management Newsletter is a monthly journal for extension agents, extension specialists, and others interested in pest management news. It provides information on legislation, regulations, and other issues affecting pest management in Georgia .

Do not regard the information in this newsletter as pest management recommendations. Consult the Georgia Pest Management Handbook, other extension publications, or appropriate specialists for this information.

Your input in this newsletter is encouraged.

If you wish to be added to the mailing list, just call us at 706-542-2816

Or write us:

Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

E-mail: bugman@uga.edu

Or visit us on the Web. You will find all the back issues there and other useful information.

http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/entomology/pestnewsletter/newsarchive.html

Sincerely:

Paul Guillebeau, Associate Professor & Extension Entomologist