The Georgia Pest Management NewsletterThe University of Georgia
College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
Cooperative Extension Service



Your source for pest management and pesticide news

 




 


January 1999/Volume 22, no. 1






Contents

It is hard to believe that we have been in business for three years

FEDERAL NEWS

The EPA is going to post information about drinking water on the Web

FOOD QUALITY PROTECTION ACT

The EPA wants your comments regarding three science policy issues
The EPA has released new instructions for pesticide registrants regarding how registration may be changed, and when they need to notify the EPA
Of the 40 organophosphates, 29 preliminary risk assessments have been delivered to registrants or returned to EPA
Vice President Gore reaffirmed his FQPA commitment at a December Farm Journal Forum in Washington
The 1998 edition of EPA's "Status of Pesticides in Registration, Reregistration, and Special Review" is available
The EPA will not provide any more Superfund money to clean up homes contaminated with methyl bromide

REDS ALERT

In addition to FQPA notices, you should pay attention to Reregistration Eligibility Documents
The EPA is seeking public input on how to reduce risks associated with aluminum phosphide and magnesium phosphide

A BRIEF LESSON IN REGULATORY AFFAIRS

Although geraniums knock Japanese beetles into a stupor for several hours, the beetles will continue to munch on geraniums day after day

HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Are you ever confused about the jargon surrounding carcinogens
A new study has been released that discusses the relationship between organochlorine pesticides and breast cancer
Do not use gasoline as a pesticide!

FROM THE COURTROOM

Monsanto takes its new seed technology seriously

PEST ALERT

The bacterium, Paenibacillus larvae, causes American foulbrood in honeybees

NEWS YOU CAN USE

Do you ever need to know what new pesticides are being developed and registered?
Hoecht and Rhone-Poulenc plan to merge their farm chemical and pharmaceuticals businesses

CANCELED


It is hard to believe we have been in business for three years. I want to thank you, The University of Georgia, and my Maker for giving me an opportunity. I hope that we have provided some useful service.

As we progress into 1999, look for ways that you can participate in these programs.

  1. IPM. Proper management of pesticide use in schools is one of the best ways we can reduce risks to our children. We are teaming up with the Georgia Pest Control Association, the Legal Environmental Assistance Foundation, extension specialists, local school districts, and others to implement IPM in Georgia schools. Thanks to everyone who participated in our recent IPM/Pesticide School Survey.

    Although IPM is widely used in Georgia and other states, we do not have a good way to measure our progress. Mark Risse and I have a grant to develop an IPM measurement system for cotton. We need cotton producers to help. If you want to volunteer, it will also be worth an hour's worth of recertification credit.

    IPM research and extension have made great strides in Georgia, but we have not done a good job of promoting it. We are developing a Web site and other materials. If you know a good IPM success story, let us know.
  2. Crop Profiles. We need to know how pesticides are used on Georgia crops. We are working with commodity groups, the Georgia Farm Bureau, extension specialists, and others to put together snap-shots of Georgia crop production. These profiles will be an important source as the Food Quality Protection Act, the Clean Water Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other mandates are implemented. Please take the time to submit information.
  3. Pesticide Applicator Training. Many people want study materials to prepare for the pesticide tests, and applicators need greater access to targeted recertification materials. Look for additional materials available in your hometown via satellite and the Web. We also plan to improve Private Applicator Training. These applicators use the same pesticides as commercial applicators, but they do not have as much training. We are especially worried about applicators that use fumigants. Dr. Steve Brown and I have grant money to develop a training program for fumigants and stored products.

    Thanks to the participation of local county agents, our February satellite broadcast will be delivered to 20 sites across Georgia. No one should have to drive more than an hour to receive five hours of pesticide recertification. If you want the downlink in your town next year, talk with your local extension service.

    We are also planning a big survey of certified pesticide applicators. We want to know if you are protecting yourself and if we are providing the kinds of instruction that you need. Please take the time to respond to our survey.
  4. Disposal of Waste Pesticides. Many people have pesticides that they can no longer use. Until 1998, I would have told you just to store them and hope for the best. The Georgia legislature has assigned nearly $250,000 for the disposal of waste pesticides. We are cooperating with the Georgia Department of Agriculture to collect and dispose of unwanted agricultural pesticides across the state. Look for an opportunity near you. Way to go, Georgia Legislators and GDA!!
  5. Worker Protection Standard. WPS has not gone away, and GDA plans to emphasize WPS compliance this year. Make sure you know what you are supposed to do. Contact your local county extension office for assistance. GDA will also do a mock inspection in your area; call them at 404-656-4958 for details. We are also planning some additional training materials to help you do the right thing.

Federal News

The EPA is going to post information about drinking water on the Web. The site will supply or link to everything you could possibly want to know about drinking water, including state plans, compliance reports, consumer confidence reports, etc. Consumer confidence reports include:

  1. information on the source of the water,
  2. an understandable definition of the Maximum Contaminant Level and MCL Goal,
  3. the actual levels of contaminants in the water,
  4. why the contaminant is considered a health concern,
  5. compliance with drinking water regulations, information on the priority of unregulated contaminants (is that an oxymoron?), and
  6. information about the EPA drinking water hotline.

If you are sure you want to know what you are drinking, here is the website.

http://www.epa.gov/safewater/

Food Quality Protection Act

The EPA wants your comments regarding three science policy issues. Don't complain about what happens if you don't bother to even consider the issues.

  1. "Proposed threshold of regulation policy when a food use does not require a tolerance" OPP-00569,
  2. "Assigning values to nondetected/nonquantified pesticide residues in human health dietary exposure assessments" OPP-00570. Suppose your equipment will only detect one part per million. If you cannot detect a pesticide, it may still be present at part per million. How should you consider that potential value? Or, as B. Clinton might say, 'what exactly do you mean by zero?'
  3. "A statistical method for incorporating nondetected pesticide residues into human health dietary exposure assessments" OPP-00571.

http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/1998/December/Day-04/o-p32344.htm -
Proposed Threshold of Regulation Policy When a Food Use Does Not Require a Tolerance

http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/1998/December/Day-04/o-p32344.htm -
Assigning Values to Nondetected/Nonquantified Pesticide Residues in Human Health Dietary Exposure Assessments

http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/1998/December/Day-04/o-p32344.htm -
A Statistical Method for Incorporating Nondetected Pesticide Residues into Human Health Dietary Exposure Assessments

You can also request a FAX by calling 202-401-0527 and select item 6024 for the paper on "Proposed threshold...", item 6025 for the paper on "Assigning values...", and item 6026 for the paper on "A statistical...."

Submit written comments by 2/4/99 by email or snail mail to the Public Information Branch of EPA. Be sure to mention the docket number mentioned with the papers above.

E-mail opp-docket@epa.gov

Snail mail

Public Information and Records Integrity Branch
Information Resources and Services Division (7502C)
EPA, Office of Pesticide Programs
401 M Street, SW
Washington, DC 20460

The EPA has released new instructions for pesticide registrants regarding how registration may be changed, and when they need to notify the EPA. For example, a registrant may change the brand name, add pests to the label (with some exceptions), delete pests from the label, change the symbols, etc., by notifying the EPA. Certain other changes, e.g., typographical errors or non-FIFRA related label elements, may be made without notifying the EPA. If you manufacture, produce, formulate, or otherwise register pesticides, you should get a copy of PR Notice 98-10. You can call FAX-on-demand to request one. Call 202-401-0527 and ask for item 6102. If that does not work, call Bob Torla at 703-308-8098); tell him that Paul sent you.

Of the 40 organophosphates, 29 preliminary risk assessments have been delivered to registrants or returned to EPA. The Agency allowed the registrants 30 days to review the initial risk assessments before they are released for general review. Some groups have taken exception at the EPA action, but it is only fair to allow the registrants to rebut any miscalculations the Agency may have made. Otherwise, a public health scare could result from a decimal point in the wrong place. (FQPA Action Line, 12-11-98)

Vice President Gore reaffirmed his FQPA commitment at a December Farm Journal Forum in Washington. He was quoted, "Of course, with all environmental measures, we must be careful what we ask of farmers. That is why I stepped in to make sure the Food Quality Protection Act was implemented fairly. I wanted to make sure that agriculture maintained a high standard of safety, but in a way that gives farmers a fair transition period so they are not unfairly penalized." (FQPA Action Line, 12-4-98)

Federal News

The 1998 edition of EPA's "Status of Pesticides in Registration, Reregistration, and Special Review" is available for free. Either visit the Web http://www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/Rainbow/98rainbo.pdf (Note: You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to view this file.) or request a hard copy by calling the National Center for Environmental Publications at 800-490-9198 (mention EPA #738-R-98-002). This manual can be very useful for finding out what is happening with your favorite pesticides.

The National Institute of Occupational Safety has revised respirator standards for particulate filters; as a result, references to filter classification on pesticide labels need to be updated. If your pesticide labels refer to respirators, you need a copy of PR 98-9. You can probably find a copy at the EPA Web site (http://www.epa.gov/) if you are computer savvy. Otherwise, call Jim Tompkins (703-305-5697) for more information.

For the unprepared, experts anticipate some major computer problems for the year 2000; I am not sure the federal government moves quickly enough to be prepared. If you want to know the EPA's plans, you can visit http://www.epa.gov/year2000. I advise you to visit before the end of the year. You will find some guidance to ensure that your data to EPA are properly received in spite of Y2K.

The EPA will not provide any more Superfund money to clean up homes contaminated with methyl bromide. The EPA reports that Congress is questioning the use of the money in this manner, and the Fund is being depleted without cleanup of other Superfund sites. From now on, EPA expects states to provide the money for cleanup. (Pestic. & Tox. Chem. News, 12-10-98)

REDs Alert

In addition to FQPA notices, you should pay attention to Reregistration Eligibility Documents (REDs). The current reregistration process requires an examination of all pesticides registered before November of 1984 in light of more stringent modern standards. FQPA also requires reregistration of all pesticides every 15 years.

REDs are more inclusive than FQPA because they include environmental risks as well as human health concerns. Understandably, the EPA is combining reregistration with FQPA activities when they can.

Beware. Both reregistration and FQPA carry some stringent schedules for EPA, and the Agency will be under considerable pressure to meet the deadlines. Depending on the source of the demands, deadlines can become more important than data and careful analysis.

What should you do? Watch this newsletter and other sources for posted REDs. The EPA makes all REDs available for public comment. Review the REDs for any pesticides that are important for your commodity. Send information to EPA if the RED is incorrect or misleading. Believe it or not, the EPA wants to do the right thing, but the Agency does not have all of the answers.

RED documents have been issued for ethoprop, methyl parathion, temephos, and terbufos in the December 16 Federal Register. You will also find the preliminary human risk assessment for methyl parathion. www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/op You must comment by February 15.

RED documents have also been issued for deet, dichlobenil, dicofol, methyl isothiazolinone, propachlor, and triclopyr.

For dicofol, http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/1998/December/Day-16/p33334.htm

If you want to look at the others,

http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/1998/December/Day-16/p33337.htm

The EPA is seeking public input on how to reduce risks associated with aluminum phosphide and magnesium phosphide, two fumigants commonly used to control insects and rodents in stored products. These products are both highly dangerous to humans and very important to agriculture. There are few or no feasible alternatives in many cases.

Proposed measures to mitigate risks include notification of local residents, buffer zones, additional monitoring, and greater worker protection.

The comment period on the RED closes March, 1999. Stakeholder holder meetings are currently planned for the spring of 1999 in Kansas City, Mo. and Sacramento, Calif. A copy of the RED is available on EPA's Internet site at: http://www.epa.gov/REDs or by contacting the OPP Pesticide Docket, Public Information and Records Integrity Branch, at 703-305-5805.

A Brief Lesson in Regulatory Affairs

I do not know if the following story is true, but I think you will agree that it could be.

Dear Mr. Citizen:
It has come to the attention of the Department of Environmental Quality that there has been recent unauthorized activity on the above referenced parcel of property. You have been certified as the legal landowner and/or contractor who did the following unauthorized activity; Construction and maintenance of two wood debris dams across the outlet stream of Spring Pond.
A permit must be issued prior to the start of this type of activity. A review of the Department's files shows that no permits have been issued. Therefore, the Department has determined that this activity is in violation of Part 301, Inland Lakes and Streams, of the Natural Resource and Environmental Protection Act, Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1994, being sections 324.30101 to 324.30113 of the Michigan Compiled Laws, annotated. The Department has been informed that one or both of the dams partially failed during a recent rain event, causing debris and flooding at downstream locations. We find that dams of this nature are inherently hazardous and cannot be permitted.
The Department therefore orders you to cease and desist all unauthorized activities at this location, and to restore the stream to a free-flow condition by removing all wood and brush forming the dams from the strewn channel. All restoration work shall be completed no later than January 31, 1998. Please notify this office when the restoration has been completed so that a follow-up site inspection may be scheduled by our staff. Failure to comply with this request or any further unauthorized activity on the site may result in this case being referred for elevated enforcement action.
We anticipate and would appreciate your full cooperation in this matter. Please feel free to contact me at this office if you have any questions.

Reply Letter----

Dear Sirs:
Your certified letter dated 12/17/97 has been handed to me for response. You sent out a great deal of carbon copies to a lot of people, but you neglected to include their addresses. You will, therefore, have to send them a copy of my response.
First of all, I am not the legal landowner and/or Contractor at 2088 Dagget, Pierson, Michigan - I am the legal owner, and a couple of beavers are in the (State unauthorized) process of constructing and maintaining two wood "debris" dams across the outlet stream of Spring Pond.
While I did not pay for, nor authorize their dam project, I think they would be highly offended you call their skillful use of natural building materials "debris." I would like to challenge you to attempt to emulate their dam project any time and/or any place you choose. I believe I can safely state there is no way you could ever match their dam skills, their dam resourcefulness, their dam ingenuity, their dam persistence, their dam determination and/or their dam work ethic.
As to your dam request the beavers first must fill out a dam permit prior to the start of this type of activity, my first dam question to you is: are you trying to discriminate against Spring Pond Beavers or do you require all beavers throughout this State to conform to said dam request?
If you are not discriminating against these particular beavers, please send me completed copies of all those other applicable beaver dam permits. Perhaps we will see if there really is a dam violation of Part 301, Inland Lakes and Streams, of the Natural Resource and Environmental Protection Act, Act 451 of the Public Acts of 1994, being sections 324.30101 to 324.30113 of the Michigan Compiled Laws annotated.
My first concern is - are the dam beavers entitled to dam legal representation? The Spring Pond Beavers are financially destitute and are unable to pay for said representation - so the State will have to provide them with a dam lawyer. The Department's dam concern that either one or both of the dams failed during a recent rain event causing dam flooding is proof we should leave the dam Spring Pond Beavers alone rather than harassing them and calling their dam names. If you want the stream "restored" to a dam free-flow condition - contact the dam beavers but if you are going to arrest them (they obviously did not pay any attention to your dam letter - being unable to read English) be sure you read them their Miranda rights first.
As for me, I am not going to cause more dam flooding or dam debris jams by interfering with these dam builders. If you want to hurt these dam beavers - be aware I am sending a copy of your dam letter and this response to PETA.
If your dam Department seriously finds all dams of this nature inherently hazardous and truly will not permit their existence in this State - I seriously hope you are not selectively enforcing this dam policy - or once again both I and the Spring Pond Beavers will scream prejudice!
In my humble opinion, the Spring Pond Beavers have a right to build their unauthorized dams as long as the sky is blue, the grass is green and water flows downstream. They have more dam right than I to live and enjoy Spring Pond.
So, as far as the beavers and I are concerned, this dam case can be referred for more elevated enforcement action now. Why wait until 1/31/98? The Spring Pond Beavers may be under the dam ice then and there will be no dam way for you or your dam staff to contact/harass them then.
In conclusion, I would like to bring to your attention a real environmental quality (health) problem: bears are actually defecating in our woods! I definitely believe you should be persecuting the defecating bears and leave the dam beavers alone. If you are going to investigate the beaver dam, watch your step - the bears are not careful where they dump.
Being unable to comply with your dam request, and being unable to contact you on your dam answering machine, I am sending this dam response to your dam office.
Sincerely,
Joe Citizen


Although geraniums knock Japanese beetles into a stupor for several hours, the beetles will continue to munch on geraniums day after day. According to popular theory, insects that feed on many different plants are more likely to learn to avoid toxins. Japanese beetles feed on more than 300 different plants, but still feed on geraniums. This phenomenon has been noted for 70 years; maybe we can develop some useful control technique for Japanese beetles. (Sci. News, 12-5-98)

Health and the Environment

Are you ever confused about the jargon surrounding carcinogens, e.g., B2, B1, A, etc.? 'A' is good, right? No 'A' is bad; 'C' is better. If you want to understand the meanings and how different pesticides are classified, visit this site. http://www.epa.gov/opp00001/carlist/table.htm

A new study has been released that discusses the relationship between organochlorine pesticides and breast cancer. Organochlorines, including DDT, aldrin, and chlordane, were once commonly used throughout the world. Nearly all of them have been banned in the U.S. Because of their persistence, however, organochlorines can still be detected in many places in the U.S. and around the world.

Health specialists have been concerned about a link between organochlorines and cancer; some data has suggested that differently organochlorines acted synergistically to increase the risk of cancer even more.

The recently published study from Copenhagen investigated 18 different organochlorines and their metabolites. The only pesticide found to increase the risk of breast cancer was dieldrin. No synergistic relationship among the pesticides was discovered.

These findings are generally positive. There was no relationship between breast cancer and most commonly used organochlorine, DDT. No synergism was discovered.

This investigation does not prove that dieldrin causes breast cancer. After all, many other similar compounds had no significant link with breast cancer. On the other hand, these results should not be the end of research into the potential links with organochlorines (and other pesticides) and cancer. If dieldrin is significantly linked with breast cancer, researchers should look closely for relationships between dieldrin and other chronic illnesses. (Lancet, 1998 352:1816, via Agromedicine Program Update, 12-15-98)

Do not use gasoline as a pesticide! Burning insects with gasoline may be psychologically satisfying, but it is very dangerous and not very effective. Two Florida men were burned recently when they used gasoline to kill fire ants in a laundry room. The pilot light on the water heater ignited the gas fumes. Ironically, the fire ant nest was probably not eliminated. Pesticides are specially formulated to kill insects; an ounce of Sevin is as effective against a yellow-jacket nest as a gallon of gasoline, but it will not blow up in your face. Use the right tool for the job. (Vero Beach Press Journal, 10-14-98 via Chemically Speaking, 12-98)

From the Courtroom

Monsanto takes its new seed technology seriously; more than 475 cases are pending for saving and replanting genetically engineered seed. Monsanto has invested millions of dollars to develop and register Round-up Ready crops and Bollgard cotton. They are not going to let farmers rob them of their investment by saving the seed. Seed piracy has cost growers from $10,000 to $35,000, not including legal fees. Additionally, their farms will be inspected for the next five years. It may be tempting to save seed and avoid the additional cost of new seed next year, but don't do it. Monsanto spent a lot of money to develop new, useful ways to control pests. They deserve to make some money from their innovation. (Ga. Crop Improvement News, J/F/M 98)

Pest Alert

University of Georgia small grain entomologists report that cereal leaf beetle is moving across Georgia. The beetles were introduced into the Great Lakes area in the 1960s from Europe, and they can cause economic losses to many small grain crops. Cereal leaf beetle is reported to be moving across Georgia at about 50 miles per year. In ten years, it will probably be a pest for most small grains grown in the state. (Market Bulletin, 12-23-98)

The bacterium, Paenibacillus larvae, causes American foulbrood in honeybees, and it is becoming resistant to the only available antibiotic. Terramycin has been used to control foulbrood successfully for a number of years, resistance has been confirmed in the U.S. Commercial beekeepers should check with their county extension office for the latest advice from extension specialists. (APIS, 11-98)

News You Can Use

Do you ever need to know what new pesticides are being developed and registered? Although people ask me about new pesticides all of the time, it has been almost impossible to keep up with progress on an ordinary, 15-hour a day work schedule. I have thought about working while I sleep, but I am afraid the results would not be significantly different.

Hurray for IR-4! See their Web site for a comprehensive list of new pesticides, including the registrant, chemical class, pest control spectrum, use rate, and registration status.

http://deal.unl.edu/pesticide/

You will also find a lot more useful information.

The IPM Practitioner has released their 1999 directory of least-toxic pest control products. It includes more than 2,000 biological controls, physical controls, monitoring devices, least-toxic chemical controls, etc. It is the most comprehensive source of its kind that I have seen. Where else could you find the Pronto Home Head Lice Detection Kit and the Bag to Seal Caskets against Phorids [flies] in one place? It also has a complete list of sources. If you would like a copy of the directory, contact BIRC (510-524-2567).

The U.S. Department of Transportation has issued new materials to explain how hazardous materials regulations apply to agricultural transportation. Visit their Web site http://hazmat.dot.gov/ or call them at 1-800-467-4922 or e-mail them at training@rspa.dot.gov

Hoecht and Rhone-Poulenc plan to merge their farm chemical and pharmaceuticals businesses. The new company will be called Aventis; they are expecting sales of $20 billion. (Pestic. & Tox. Chem. News, 12-10-98)

Canceled

The following products will be canceled at the request of the registrants unless the request is withdrawn by May 28, 1999. The products can be sold for another year, and end-users can continue to use the pesticides according to the label. Refer to the Dec. 2, 1998 Federal Register for more details.

Most of these products contain rotenone, which has been voluntarily canceled for food uses.



123 M.A.G. Rigo 3-In-1 Vegetable Dust
AFC Zinc Phosphide 80 Riverside 2,4-D LV 6
Agrisect Rotenone Dust 1% Ronilan Fungicide 50W
Black Leaf Tomato & Vegetable Insect Killer Rose & Flower Insect Killer
Bug Blitz Science 1% Rotenone
Fish-Tox-5 SMCP Single Fill
Kill-Ko Bean Beetle Dust SMCP Zinc Phosphide
Kill-Ko Rat Killer Spotrete-F
Kill-Ko Thro Pac Blox Weather Proof Parafinnized Rat Tiger Brand 1% Rotenone Dust
Miller V-75 A Dust Tomato & Vegetable Dust or Spray
Pratt 1% Rotenone Dust or Spray Unicorn Rotenone Fire Ant Killer
Pratt DX Insect Spray Waterbed Conditioner (I won't guess what pests are supposed to be controlled.)
Prentox Cube Flea & Tick Dip Zinc Phosphide (Rumetan) 90%
Zinc Phosphide Rodenticide for Controlling Orchard Mice


The appearance of any trade name in this newsletter is not intended to endorse that product nor convey negative implications of unmentioned products.

Dear Readers:

The Georgia Pest Management Newsletter is a monthly journal for Extension agents, Extension specialists, and others interested in pest management news. It provides information on legislation, regulations, and other issues affecting pest management in Georgia.

Do not regard the information in this newsletter as pest management recommendations. Consult the Georgia Pest Control Handbook, other extension publications, or appropriate specialists for this information.

Your input in this newsletter is encouraged.

If you wish to be added to the mailing list, just call us at 706-542-1765

Or write us:

Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

E-mail: pguillebeau@bugs.ent.uga.edu

Receive GPMN via e-mail if you prefer. Just let us know.

Or visit us on the Web. You will find all the back issues and other useful information.

http://www.ces.uga.edu/ces/wnews.html

Sincerely:

Paul Guillebeau, Assistant Professor & Extension Entomologist