Cooperative Extension Service
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Your source for pest management and pesticide news

July 2004/Volume 27, No. 7

The Fifth National IPM Symposium, "Delivering on a Promise," will be held in St. Louis, MO, on April 4-6, 2006

NEWS YOU CAN USE

The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST) is releasing its newest Special Publication entitled "Management of Pest Resistance: Strategies Using Crop Management, Biotechnology, and Pesticides."
The Georgia Department of Agriculture has approved an amendment of the special local need registration for the use of Imidan 70-W Insecticide for control of blueberry maggot and cranberry fruit worm in blueberries in Georgia
The Georgia Department of Agriculture has issued a special local need registration for the following products

FOOD QUALITY PROTECTION ACT AND REREGISTRATION

The EPA has opened a comment period ending August 24 for the preliminary risk assessment for amitraz
Comments on the FQPA Tolerance Reassessment and Risk Management Decision for Oryzalin are due by July 30
The revised EPA risk assessment of thiram is available
The EPA risk assessments for 2,4-D are available for comment until August 23
Comments on the risk assessment for metam sodium are due by August 2
The interim reregistrationeligibility document for methyl parathion is available for comments until August 2

HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Here is a poster from EPA that created quite a stir for some groups
The EPA launched a new Spanish public service announcement on Hispanic Radio Network to help individuals reduce pesticide risks around the home
Spanish-speaking individuals can also view EPA's household consumer information on proper pesticide storage and disposal in Spanish

MONEY

About $5 million in grant money is available from USDA for projects that can enhance the prosperity of small farms and rural agricultural communities

FEDERAL NEWS

The EPA is reopening the comment period (deadline, August 16) regarding proposed standards for pesticide containers and pesticide containment structures
The EPA has established a tolerance exemption for Aspergillus flavus NRRL 21882 on peanuts when the products with this ingredient are used according to the label

BIOTECHNOLOGY

Planned or ongoing projects focus on the use of genetically modified (GM) plants to produce human vaccines

DON'T DO IT

We had requests for additional stories concerning pesticide users that would boost the self-esteem of almost anyone else


 

The Fifth National IPM Symposium, "Delivering on a Promise," will be held in St. Louis, MO, on April 4-6, 2006, at the Adams Mark Hotel. Symposium sessions will address state of the art strategies and technologies to successfully solve pest problems in agricultural, recreational, natural, and community settings.

Integrated Pest Management, or IPM, is an approach to managing insects, wildlife, weeds, plant diseases, and other pests that relies on knowing the biology and ecology of pests, and applying that knowledge to prevent pest problems. IPM practitioners use inspection and monitoring to detect and resolve conditions that encourage pests and apply effective cultural, mechanical, and biological solutions, with chemical pesticides only as needed.

The Fourth IPM Symposium, held in 2003, attracted more than 700 research, education, government, industry, and environmental and health advocacy professionals from 17 countries for three days of information sharing, networking, and organizing on key pest management issues we face.

News You Can Use

The Council for Agricultural Science and Technology (CAST) is releasing its newest Special Publication entitled "Management of Pest Resistance: Strategies Using Crop Management, Biotechnology, and Pesticides."Fifty-two presentations are collected in these 191-page proceedings from an April 2003 CAST-convened symposium on pest resistance management (PRM). Major objectives of the meeting included identifying common issues related to PRM across disciplines, considering ways to remove barriers to effective preventive resistance management, describing research activities in PRM, and disseminating this information to a wide audience of stakeholders. You can find the details at the CAST website at http://www.cast-science.org/

The Georgia Department of Agriculture has approved an amendment of the special local need registration for the use of Imidan 70-W Insecticide for control of blueberry maggot and cranberry fruitworm in blueberries in Georgia. The new label increases the maximal seasonal use rate from 4 lbs/acre to 6.67 lbs/acre.

The Georgia Department of Agriculture has issued a special local need registration for the following products.

EPA SLN GA-040004 and EPA SLN GA-040005
BravoUltrex SLN GA-040004 (EPA Reg. No. 50534-201)
Bravo Weatherstick SLN GA-040005 (EPA Reg. No. 50534-188)
For Post-Harvest Control of Septoria Leaf Spot and Rust in Blueberries in Georgia

The section 3 labels for these products allow blueberries to be treated through early bloom. The 24C will allow these products to be used post-harvest to help maintain healthy leaves for the next blueberry season.

Food Quality Protection Act and Reregistration

The EPA has opened a comment period ending August 24 for the preliminary risk assessment for amitraz. Amitraz is primarily used for control of lice, mites, and other external parasites of cattle, hogs, and pets. The registrant is voluntarily canceling several other food uses that are not part of this risk assessment.

Although the Agency may revise the risk assessment based on new information, the preliminary risk assessment suggests residential risks of concern posed by dog collars impregnated with amitrazand dietary risks posed by amitraz residues in milk. If new information does not change the risk assessment, EPA is likely to take regulatory action to address the risks of concern.

You will find more details at http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/reregistration/status.htm If your industry depends on amitraz, take the time to review the assessment and make appropriate comments.

Comments on the FQPA Tolerance Reassessment and Risk Management Decision for Oryzalin are due by July 30. The Agency has reassessed oryzalin tolerances and completed the reregistration eligibility decision. If you care about oryzalin, visit this web site for details. http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/2004/June/Day-30/p14608.htm Identify your comments by docket ID number OPP-2004-0143. Contact: Christina Scheltema, Special Review and Reregistration Division (7508C), Office of Pesticide Programs, telephone number: (703) 308-2201; fax number: (703) 308-2201; e-mail address: scheltema.christina@epa.gov

The revised EPA risk assessment of thiram is available at http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/2004/July/Day-02/p15179.htm If you need thiram, comment on the benefits and make suggestions to reduce the risks. Identify your comments by docket ID number OPP-2004-0183 Contact: Craig Doty, Special Review and Reregistration Division (7508C), Office of Pesticide Programs, telephone number: (703) 308-0122; fax number: (703) 308-8041; e-mail address: doty.craig@epa.gov

The primary concerns in these risk assessments focus on scenarios where 2,4-D is applied to water. Swimmers may face an elevated risk, but the risks are not clear based on available data. This chemical is classified as Class D human cancer risk; the data are insufficient to classify 2,4-D as a human carcinogen.

You can read more about the risk analysis here http://www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/reregistration/24d/2_4d_ques_and_anws.htm

Identify comments by the docket identification (ID) number OPP-2004-0167. You can contact Mark Seaton, Special Review and Reregistration Division (7508C), Office of Pesticide Programs, telephone number: (703) 306-0469; e-mail address: seaton.mark@epa.gov

Comments on the risk assessment for metam sodium are due by August 2. The EPA has health and environmental risks. Metam sodium is very important for vegetables and other commodities, and some people think that the EPA risk assessment is based on incomplete and/or flawed information and analysis. You can find the assessments here http://docket.epa.gov/edkpub/do/EDKStaffCollectionDetailViewByID?collectionId=OPP-2004-0159

The interim reregistration eligibility document for methyl parathion is available for comments until August 2. The document is labeled "interim" because the cumulative assessment for the group of organophosphate insecticides has not been completed. You can find the IRED here http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/2004/June/Day-02/p12307.htm  Comments, identified by docket ID number OPP-2003-0237, must be received on or before August 2, 2004. Contact: John Pates, Special Review and Reregistration Division (7508C), Office of Pesticide Programs, telephone number: (703) 308-8195; e-mail address: pates.john@epa.gov

Health and the Environment

Here is a poster from EPA that created quite a stir for some groups. Apparently, they thought it was too much of an exaggeration. Make up your own mind. An alternate title might be "You don't have to walk on water to practice IPM around the home."

The EPA launched a new Spanish public service announcement on Hispanic Radio Network to help individuals reduce pesticide risks around the home. The campaign is intended to help Spanish-speaking people avoid unnecessary and potentially dangerous exposure to chemicals.

Hispanics represent 84 percent of the farm workers in the United States. Farm workers may be exposed to pesticides on the job, and their families may experience second-hand exposure to pesticides because traces of the chemical(s) may be "tracked-in" from the field. The majority of pesticide products contain labels written in English only; in these cases, people who primarily speak and write in Spanish may not understand or follow usage and safety directions. In addition, people living in multi-family housing in urban environments, including many Hispanics, may be exposed to pesticides because of pest control measures for common urban pests such as cockroaches and rodents. HRN's campaign will help increase Hispanic people's awareness of these important issues.

The educational series will air on Hispanic Radio Network's environmental program "Planeta Azul" ("Blue Planet"), running daily June 21 through June 29. "PlanetaAzul" is broadcast by the network's 194 radio station affiliates throughout the United Statesand Puerto Rico. For more information on protecting children from household hazards including pesticides and lead, see: http://www.epa.gov/oppfod01/cb/10_tips// (Text in English); or http://www.epa.gov/oppfod01/cb/10_tips/childesp.htm (Text in Spanish). To find a Hispanic Radio Network affiliate near your community, see http://www.hispanicradio.com/

Spanish-speaking individuals can also view EPA's household consumer information on proper pesticide storage and disposal in Spanish. Visit http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/regulating/storage.htm and click on the "En espanol" button above the "Quick Resources" box. Translating this information into Spanish is important to help improve the storage and disposal of household pesticides within the large Hispanic population in the United States.

Money

About $5 million in grant money is available from USDA for projects that can enhance the prosperity of small farms and rural agricultural communities (deadline October 5). No, you cannot just give them part of the money. Integrated research, education, and extension project awards for this program are expected to have a total budget (including indirect costs) of no more than $500,000 for 2-4 years of support.

The purpose of this program is to foster interdisciplinary studies and improve our understanding of the interactions between the economic, social, biological, and environmental components important to small farms and rural economic development. Applicants are expected to propose hypotheses that are testable and to use quantitative approaches. Projects should address small farms, rural agricultural communities, or both small farms and rural communities when interrelated.

Proposals are sought that develop and test hypotheses in the following priority areas:

  1. comparisons of approaches to environmental management and compliance related to the prosperity of rural communities and/or profitability of agricultural products;
  2. analysis of the interactions that affect high return production, processing and delivery channels, and in turn, enhance profitability of small farms;
  3. evaluation of the interplay between social, economic, biological and environmental factors that affect the adoption of new agricultural technology, management and/or foster rural agribusiness development; or
  4. identification of emerging opportunities and threats for small to medium sized farms, and associated rural communities over the next 20 years.

More information is available at www.csrees.usda.gov/fo/fundview.cfm?fonum=1200 . Questions regarding the suitability of proposals should be directed to Dr. Siva Sureshwaran (ssureshwaran@csrees.usda.gov) or Dr. Diana Jerkins (djerkins@csrees.usda.gov).

Federal News

The EPA is reopening the comment period (deadline, August 16) regarding proposed standards for pesticide containers and pesticide containment structures. The Agency first published the proposed rule back in 1994 but has taken no final action. You will find the proposed action at http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/2004/June/Day-30/p14463.htm

Comments, identified by docket ID number OPP-2004-0049 must be received on or before August 16, 2004. Contact: Nancy Fitz, Field and External Affairs Division (7506C), Office of Pesticide Programs, telephone number: (703) 305-7385; fax number: (703) 308-3259; e-mail address: fitz.nancy@epa.gov

The EPA has established a tolerance exemption for Aspergillus flavus NRRL 21882 on peanuts when the products with this ingredient are used according to the label. Another strain of A. flavus is responsible for aflatoxin, a powerful carcinogen, in peanuts. The NRRL 21882 strain can be used to competitively exclude the more dangerous strain. This regulation was effective June 30, 2004. You must object or request a hearing by August 30, 2004.

You can read the details at http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-PEST/2004/June/Day-30/p14609.htm. If you do not like it, contact Shanaz Bacchus, Biopesticides and Pollution Prevention Division (7511C), Environmental Protection Agency, telephone number: (703) 308-8097; e-mail address: bacchus.shanaz@epa.gov

Biotechnology

Planned or ongoing projects focus on the use of genetically modified (GM) plants to produce human vaccines. Clinical trials of vaccines produced by a group of European scientists are planned for 2009; the first crops would be grown in 2006. The first product planned from this group is an antibody that can be used as a vaginal cream to block transmission of HIV. The next product would be a rabies vaccine; rabies still kills up to 70,000 (mostly children) people a year in Africa and southeast Asia.

This project will focus on benefits to developing countries. Feasible plants and procedures will be freely licensed to developing countries, and the plant production and processing would take place locally.

Cuba is already using a similar approach to produce human proteins in tobacco plants that allow the purification of Hepatitis B vaccine.

Although the benefits are obvious, there are concerns about potential human and environmental threats from this technology. The best plants would produce the desired products in sterile seeds, and the plants should be isolated from food crops.

You can find more information at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/3887517.stm

Don't Do It

We had requests for additional stories concerning pesticide users that would boost the self-esteem of almost anyone else. Our first shortsighted applicator needed to use an insecticide formulated as an emulsifiable concentrate (EC). The ECs are the most common liquid pesticide formulation, and they form a very white emulsion when they are mixed with water. This applicator thought that an empty milk jug would be a handy container. He left this milk jug full of white pesticide in the kitchen and went outside. The lady of the house sees the milk jug of pesticide and gives her husband a tongue lashing in absentia for leaving the milk (or so she thought) on the kitchen counter. She puts the container of milky white pesticide into the refrigerator.

Later, our antihero returns to the scene of the crime. He is convinced that he needs a refreshing gulp of healthy, cold  . . . milk. As many of the more thoughtful men do, he decides to drink directly from the jug instead of getting a glass dirty and creating more work for his long-suffering spouse. Instead of becoming healthier, his physical condition takes a sudden, decided turn for the worse. The hospital is the next stop. After treatment, this applicator leaves the hospital, returned to health and (we hope) a wiser man.

We have other stories of pesticides stored in food or drink containers that have tragic endings. NEVER store pesticide in any container that could be mistaken for food or drink. A child can be injured by a small amount of pesticide.

Our second story begins with our wise and handsome pesticide/IPM coordinator speaking about the evils of using pesticides illegally. Georgia has a big problem with people using pesticides to kill dogs; aldicarb (Temik) is often the chemical of choice. As our hero rants on, he sees audience members nod in agreement and quietly close their eyes (probably to meditate about the problem). Eventually, he is convinced that, at least, this small audience will never again be a party to illegal pesticide use. His optimism is short-lived. The first question after the lecture is, "Can I use Temik to kill beavers?"

Very often the people using aldicarb illegally are not the original purchasers of the chemical. The person with a problem animal approaches a friend, a neighbor, a cousin, etc., in agriculture and asks to "borrow" a bit of aldicarb. Country people are usually generous by nature and grant the request without understanding the potential for big trouble.

Using aldicarb or nearly any other pesticide to kill animals is illegal, and this practice can cause several problems.

  1. The Georgia Department of Agriculture will try to locate and prosecute the person who purchased the pesticide even if they were not the illegal applicator.
  2. The applicator is subject to criminal and civil penalties, particularly if a beloved pet or protected animal species is killed by mistake. Aldicarb is very toxic; a very small amount will kill an animal or a child. Scavengers that feed on poisoned animals may also be killed.
  3. Every time an animal is killed with aldicarb, it becomes more likely that EPA will further restrict or cancel the registration of aldicarb. This insecticide is valuable for cotton and pecan production; it would be ironic if the growers helped to cancel it.

The appearance of any trade name in this newsletter is not intended to endorse that product nor convey negative implications of unmentioned products.

Dear Readers:

The Georgia Pest Management Newsletter is a monthly journal for extension agents, extension specialists, and others interested in pest management news. It provides information on legislation, regulations, and other issues affecting pest management in Georgia.

Do not regard the information in this newsletter as pest management recommendations. Consult the Georgia Pest Management Handbook, other extension publications, or appropriate specialists for this information.

Your input in this newsletter is encouraged.

If you wish to be added to the mailing list, just call us at 706-542-2816.

Or write us:

Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

E-mail: bugman@uga.edu

Or visit us on the Web. You will find all the back issues there and other useful information.

http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/entomology/pestnewsletter/newsarchive.html

Sincerely:

Dr. Paul Guillebeau, Associate Professor & Extension Entomologist