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Cooperative Extension Service
The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences

Your source for pest management and pesticide news

June 2004/Volume 27, No. 6

NEWS YOU CAN USE

These web sites will help you maintain a healthy and attractive landscape in spite of droughty conditions and water restrictions
The picture below is a deer tick, the vector of Lyme disease

FOOD QUALITY PROTECTION ACT AND REREGISTRATION

The end of the line approaches for diazinon products registered for use around the home
The EPA will incorporate additional information into a revised risks assessment for malathion
The clock is running on a 60-day comment period for the Reregistration Eligibility Decision on diuron
If you comment on any government policy or regulation, these tips will help you communicate effectively

HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

One of our clients was concerned that Bayer Advanced All in One Rose and Flower Care might injure birds and butterflies

FEDERAL NEWS

Joint grants totaling $102,000 have been awarded to nine projects designed to demonstrate the effective use of biological pesticides
The EPA has issued draft guidance for revising mosquito pesticide labels

BIOTECHNOLOGY

The countries of Europe are moving forward with regulations concerning genetically modified foods

DON'T DO IT

Many people ignore the risks of household pesticides and often create hazardous situations by not following the label directions

News You Can Use

These web sites will help you maintain a healthy and attractive landscape in spite of droughty conditions and water restrictions. Water stress can harm plants directly, and it can make plants more susceptible to injury by pests. The University of Georgia has two excellent publications that will help you do more with less water.

http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/B1073.htm

http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/horticulture/Drought.html

The picture below is a deer tick, the vector of Lyme disease. We get many calls during the summer from people who are concerned about a tick they found on themselves or some member of their family. This image is from an excellent public-domain collection maintained by USDA at http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/graphics/photos/

The good news is that Lyme disease is not common in Georgia. Additionally, tick-borne diseases are not usually transmitted unless the tick remains attached for a number of hours.

The bad news is that ticks also transmit other potentially serious diseases like Rocky Mountain spotted fever and ehrlichiosis. However, a few simple rules can help you reduce your risk of tick-borne diseases.

To reduce tick populations around your home, treat your dog with an approved pesticide for ticks, keep the grass cut short, and fence the yard to keep out other dogs. If you need to use a pesticide, consult your local extension office for recommendations. Dogs can serve as a reservoir for both Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Rocky Mountain spotted fever does not seem to affect dogs, but Lyme disease can cause joint pain in dogs.

You can find more information at http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/L417.htm

Food Quality Protection Act and Reregistration

The end of the line approaches for diazinon products registered for use around the home. The stop-sale date for all diazinon outdoor home products is December 31, 2004; the indoor products have already been canceled.

End users may continue to use existing stocks according to the label. If your landscape business uses diazinon around customers' homes, you are taking a chance to continue using diazinon, legally or not.

You will find a list of the diazinon registrations slated for cancellation at www.epa.gov/pesticides. You can also comment if you wish, but I doubt if public comments will change this course of action.

The EPA will incorporate additional information into a revised risks assessment for malathion. The Agency plans to complete the revised assessment in late summer; a 60-day public comment period will follow in October. Decisions regarding risk mitigation will be made after the comment period, and the reregistration eligibility document is scheduled for release in May 2005. You will find EPA's current assessment of malathion at http://www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/op/malathion.htm

Any risk mitigation actions will be based on about 150 malathion registrations that are considered to be the major labels. However, a minor label may permit malathion application to a critical use area. The EPA and USDA want to be sure that important malathion labels are not overlooked.

You should respond to USDA if you are aware of any malathion product label that fills a crucial pest management need for agriculture. Provide the EPA Registration Number, the crop(s)/livestock/poultry use site of interest, the maximum application rate needed, the pest(s) of concern and your contact information to facilitate future discussions with EPA.

You should also respond if malathion is important for any of the following uses that are not being supported by the technical registrant.

All pet uses Cranberries
All livestock uses Filberts
All indoor uses (except for some stored commodities and storage facilities, and mushroom houses) Peanuts (including forage, hay, storage facilities)
Safflower seed Peavines
Soybeans (including hay and forage) Sugar beets
All greenhouse uses Sunflower seed
All open forest land uses Tobacco
All seed treatments Treated raisin trays
Almonds (including hulls and shells) All pressurized can formulations


For example, if a pressurized can of malathion is the only thing that makes life worth living, speak up now. Please respond online at http://www.sripmc.org/requests/answer.cfm?RID=97

The clock is running on a 60-day comment period for the Reregistration Eligibility Decision on diuron. Diuronis, the active ingredient in products registered as a pre- and post-emergent herbicide, a mildewcide/preservative (in paints), and an algaecide for ponds/aquariums.

Submit comments by 6-21-04. The EPA docket ID is OPP-2003-0349. You may comment via

  1. the web http://www.epa.gov/edocket/ (this method is anonymous);
  2. by e-mail opp-docket@epa.gov (Attention: Docket ID Number OPP-2003-0349);
  3. through snail-mail to Public Information and Records Integrity Branch (PIRIB) (7502C), Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP), Environmental Protection Agency, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW,  Washington, DC 20460-0001;
  4. or means of hand delivery or courier to Public Information and Records Integrity Branch (PIRIB), Office of Pesticide Programs (OPP), Environmental Protection Agency, Rm. 119, Crystal Mall #2, 1921 Jefferson Davis Hwy, Arlington, VA. Deliveries are only accepted during the docket's normal hours of operation as identified in Unit I.B.1.
  5. Semaphore or smoke signals cannot be accepted.

All wettable powder formulations will be canceled at the request of the registrant. Additionally, the EPA is considering these regulatory actions for diuron.

If you comment on any government policy or regulation, these tips will help you communicate effectively.

Health and the Environment

One of our clients was concerned that Bayer Advanced All in One Rose and Flower Care might injure birds and butterflies. The active ingredients in this product are tebuconazole fungicide and imidacloprid insecticide. Here is the response from Bayer. "I can understand your concern, but Bayer Advanced All in One Rose and Flower Care will not be harmful to birds and insects not listed on the label. The only time I would avoid using it is if you have birds whose main food source is your flowers -- like the hummingbirds."

Federal News

Joint grants totaling $102,000 have been awarded to nine projects designed to demonstrate the effective use of biological pesticides, called biopesticides, to promote their adoption in agriculture. Biopesticides are certain types of pesticides derived from such natural materials as animals, plants, bacteria, and certain minerals.

The grants were awarded based on criteria including the potential for risk reduction combined with effective pest control. Recipients of biopesticide demonstration grants are

More information on EPA's regulation of biopesticides is available at: http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/biopesticides/

The EPA has issued draft guidance for revising mosquito pesticide labels. Commercial mosquito products present special risks because they may be used over large areas and applied near water. The Agency hopes to reduce risks and make the labeling more consistent. The following items are under consideration.

  1. Indicate that products are for use only by professionals or government agencies.
  2. Make labels specific for mosquito control; remove other uses from the labeling.
  3. Harmonize environmental risk statements among various mosquito products.
  4. Remind users to check with state and local agencies for other pertinent regulations.
  5. Include specific information about appropriate droplet size of applications.
  6. Strengthen label language regarding protection of bees.
  7. Add more specific language about treatment intervals and timing of applications.

You can read the details at http://www.epa.gov/PR_Notices/draftpr2004-XX.pdf. The deadline for comments is July 27.

Biotechnology

The countries of Europeare moving forward with regulations concerning genetically modified foods. In April, Europe's Agriculture Council of Ministers did not approve a genetically modified (GM) sweet corn (Bt-11) for food use in the European Union (EU). The corn is already approved for human consumption in 12 countries outside the EU. The EU Scientific Committee on Food had already declared the corn to be as safe as its conventional counterparts. (Crop Biotech Update, 4-30-04)

In May, however, the EU lifted a five-year ban on GM food. The EU's executive commission approved an application by Syngentato import Bt-11 sweet corn. The EU health commissioner reported the sweet corn has undergone "the most rigorous pre-marketing assessment in the world" by EU food safety scientists.

Syngenta can import the canned Bt-11 sweet corn into Europe for 10 years if the cans are clearly labeled as containing GM products. The EU is currently studying another 33 applications for the marketing or cultivation of GM food in Europe. A moratorium on approving new GM products was imposed in 1999 due to public concern about their environmental impact and safety as food. (Crop Biotech Update, 5-21-04)

Don't Do It

Many people ignore the risks of household pesticides and often create hazardous situations by not following the label directions. These examples from the California Department of Pesticide Regulation may help you avoid problems with pesticides. You probably already suspected that you are smarter than "they" are. Thanks to University of Florida Chemically Speaking for pointing us in the right direction.

A homeowner bought an incendiary device intended for gophers and dropped it down a plumbing vent on his roof to keep rats from coming in through the toilet. The resulting fire caused $80,000 in damage. The rats probably survived.

A woman used four insecticide foggers when one would have treated her 1,000 ft2 apartment. She left the house but returned several times to retrieve forgotten items. Paramedics had to come to the rescue; one of them also became ill because he was not wearing respiratory protection.

A 38-year-old woman thought a home remedy for head lice sounded like a good idea. She applied 8 ounces of dog flea-and-tick shampoo and olive oil to her scalp and wrapped her head in cellophane for five hours. Not surprisingly, the woman's scalp began to itch and burn, in addition causing her nausea and drooling.

A man spraying his yard with diazinon stopped to place a wad of tobacco into his mouth, but he did not wash his hands. He began vomiting, salivating, and experienced shortness of breath.

An apartment resident sprayed three aerosol cans of lice treatment on his bed and went to sleep in the same bed. He awoke with a headache, nausea, and vomiting. He told investigators he assumed the more insecticide he used, the more effective it would be.

If your self-esteem begins to sag, you can read more at http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/pressrls/april5_2004.htm

The appearance of any trade name in this newsletter is not intended to endorse that product nor convey negative implications of unmentioned products.

Dear Readers:

The Georgia Pest Management Newsletter is a monthly journal for extension agents, extension specialists, and others interested in pest management news. It provides information on legislation, regulations, and other issues affecting pest management in Georgia.

Do not regard the information in this newsletter as pest management recommendations. Consult the Georgia Pest Management Handbook, other extension publications, or appropriate specialists for this information.

Your input in this newsletter is encouraged.

If you wish to be added to the mailing list, just call us at 706-542-2816

Or write us:

Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602
E-mail: bugman@uga.edu

Or visit us on the Web. You will find all the back issues there and other useful information.

http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/entomology/pestnewsletter/newsarchive.html

Sincerely:

Dr. Paul Guillebeau, Associate Professor and Extension Entomologist