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GeorgiaAudio.net CAES Radio Releases -- Week of: 3-28-05
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This Week's Titles:
Committing Land For Land Use Conservation Go to it
College Scientists Discovering New Beetles Go to it
Planning Out Meals Can Save Money Go to it
Honey Bees Help Control Blueberry Disease Go to it
Diet Busters Trained In South Georgia Go to it

 

 

Committing Land For Land Use Conservation 1:37

An increasing number of Georgian's are looking at land use conservation.

Government agencies along with rural landowners want to maintain land units in agricultural, forest, or other "Low" development conditions. Severing development rights to a tract of land from the land itself, through the sale or gift of those rights to individuals, or agencies is one method of maintaining land in a conservation use. Curt Lacy, an agricultural economist with the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences says people in both urban and agricultural areas should consider all options before committing part of their land to land use conservation. "But once they get to thinking about the long term implications of what they're doing here and not just the fact that there won't be a house built on it for say the next five to ten years, but the fact that their heirs will never be able to sell that property, because it doesn't have any development rights or they can sell it, but it would just have to remain in an agricultural or non-developed use." Curt Lacy with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, who adds there are several tax issues landowners also need to look at as they consider setting aside some of their land for land use conservation. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.

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College Scientists Discovering New Beetles 1:34

College scientists often get swamped while looking for new creatures.

As of 2005, around 365,000 beetle species have been identified and described. But scientists with the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences say they have a lot more work to do, since there are millions of beetle species that are unknown, and have not been identified. It's important to learn and identify as many beetle species as possible, since each one plays an important role in the environment. "You know each one of these creatures out there has a different role and they all are doing something out in the environment and we don't even know some of these beetles, the vast majority of them even exist, let alone knowing what they do out in nature." That was Joe McHugh with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. University scientists are studying thousands of specimens borrowed from museums around the world. They're collecting new samples from the field, too, for aspects of the project that require data from different developmental stages, or from DNA. Over the next four years, they plan to conduct beetle research in Panama, Chile, South Africa, and Australia. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.

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Planning Out Meals Can Save Money 1:30

Spending a small amount of time planning out meals could help families save money.

According to a recent study, many people don't start thinking about what they will have for dinner until four o' clock in the afternoon. Specialists with the University of Georgia's College of Family and Consumer Sciences say you could save around twenty-six dollars a month by making one trip to the grocery store, instead of four or five. Those trips also are getting more expensive, since fuel prices in most of Georgia are near two-dollars a gallon. Planning ahead could also help families eat healthier. "Because that way you're likely to include fruits and vegetables, and a variety of different foods and you're likely to eat a healthier diet as well as save money in the long run." That was Gail Hanula with the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. As you plan out your meals, and make your grocery list, include items for several quick, easy meals, such as a box of pasta, and a jar of spaghetti sauce, canned soup, and frozen pizza. The university specialist goes on to say spending fifteen to thirty minutes once a week planning your meals can save you money and time. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.

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Honey Bees Help Control Blueberry Disease 1:28

College scientists are teaming up with honey bees, to get control of a serious problem in blueberry orchards.

Blueberry producers welcome honey bees to their groves, because they do a good job pollinating rabbiteye blueberries. Unfortunately, bees also carry a fungus that infects the flower, which leads to mummy berry disease. Scientist with the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences are conducting tests to find if honey bees can transmit an agent to blueberries that will reduce pressure from mummy berry disease. "Where we spread a beneficial bacterium with the honey bees, and the bacterium will out compete the disease causing fungus on the sight of the flower itself." That was Keith Delaplane with the college of agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Bee hives were fitted with dispensers holding the bacterium so bees coming out of the hive picked up the beneficial bacterium on their bodies, and delivered it to the blueberry flowers. Results of this study indicate use of a hive-dispersed biocontrol product as a supplement during pollination can reduce the risk of mummy berry disease in blueberries. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.

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Diet Busters Trained In South Georgia 1:33

Diet Busters are being trained in several South Georgia counties.

Despite spending forty million dollars a year on dieting, and diet related products, the obesity rate only got worse, and doubled over the last decade. Some South Georgia counties realized proper eating needed to be taught in schools, so they became "Diet Busters." Emily Ryan, a county extension agent in Dougherty County says the training wanted to shed some light on why some diets are not effective in the long term. "Some of them can be very misleading so we just try to break them down, make them a little easier, help them understand why they help people lose weight but why they're not effective in the long term and then try to help them to see some more basic simple things they could do to just be healthier." Emily Ryan with the University of Georgia's College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. In 2004 over one-thousand South Georgia school nutrition workers took part in the training and became "Diet Busters." Over ninety percent of the nutrition employees indicated they would do a better job encouraging students to make healthier food choices. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.

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