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CAES Radio Releases -- Week of: 2-19-01
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This week's titles:

Hated Cockroach Gets High Tech Makeover
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Mad Cow Disease Once Again Causing Concerns
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Positive Developments Continue On A Killer
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Greenhouse Growers Will Use Less Water In The Future
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Deadly Soybean Disease Being Brought Under Control
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Hated Cockroach Gets High Tech Makeover
1:27

One of the world's oldest creatures gets a high-tech make-over, so students can better understand it and its biological cousins.


Cockroaches have been around for about 300 million years, but compact discs, like the ones we use for music and computer programs, haven't been around nearly as long. Well, scientists with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have combined a roach and a compact disc to study insects. But why concentrate on an insect people love to hate? "Cockroaches are a great model to study to learn a lot about all insects." That was Joe McHugh with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. Hundreds of drawings make up a virtual roach that only lives in a computer, but allow a student to look at one in almost any way imaginable. The student could peel away layer after layer, electronically dissecting the insect without touching it. Electron microscope images are a click away, as well as real pictures. So the virtual roach will be welcomed by entomology students, because they can learn faster and at their convenience by using the compact disc. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.


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Mad Cow Disease Once Again Causing Concerns
1:35
Mad Cow madness is back.

A frightening report of "mad cow disease" dangers has reared its ugly head again. New York city health officials began investigating sales of Mamba fruit chew candy. The distributor of the Mamba product insists it poses no health risk, even though it contains a beef-based gelatin. But an animal scientist with the University of Georgia Extension Service says everyone should remember the United States record with mad cow disease. "We have never had a case in the United States. It's a major problem in England. It's spread into some of the European countries, but at this point and time we have never found it in North America," (says) Ronnie Silcox with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, who adds the United States stays on high alert to keep the disease out of the country. We don't import live cattle or beef from countries with reported cases of mad cow disease. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.


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Positive Developments Continue On A Killer
1:27

We should continue to gain on a killer in the year 2001.


The American Cancer Society is not predicting a cure for cancer in the year 2001, but they are predicting another drop in cancer rates. The drop in cancer rates began in the early-�90s. But a nutrition specialist with the University of Georgia Extension Service says the news is not all good about cancer. "But because the population has really grown in recent years, the total number of people who will likely get cancer is increasing, but that's just a reflection of our increasing population," (says) Marilyn Wright with the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. The American Cancer Society report also expresses concerns about obesity. There is more evidence that suggests obesity increases the risk of women developing cancers of the breast, uterus and gall bladder. Obesity could also increase the risk of men developing colon and prostate cancers. So despite the positive gains, there's still a lot of work to do before cancer will be completely conquered. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.


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Greenhouse Growers Will Use Less Water In The Future
1:22

Greenhouse growers in Georgia will need less water in the future, thanks to college research.


Many growers use sprinklers to water plants grown in greenhouses. A lot of the water sinks into the ground never to be used again. Since the mid-�90s, scientists with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences have been growing plants in tubs that sit on tables in greenhouses. Since water is applied to plants in the tubs, the water can be recycled and used again. "We grow the plants in large tubs. The tubs are flooded once a day and after the plants are watered, the water drains back into a large holding tank and can be reused again the next day." That was Marc Van Iersel with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, who adds by recycling water in greenhouses, the amount of water consumed is reduced by about 50 percent. The research has also found problems with ground water and surface water pollution are reduced, since there is much less runoff from greenhouses. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.


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Deadly Soybean Disease Being Brought Under Control
1:42

A disease that cost soybean farmers millions of dollars is being brought under control by college scientists.

In 1983, the southern stem canker invaded soybean fields in Georgia for the first time. The new disease wiped out many fields and was a serious threat to soybean production throughout entire regions. But scientists with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences began fighting back. After about three years of work and research, several soybean varieties were developed that were resistant to the southern stem canker. "About all we could say was don't plant in that field and don't plant that variety again. But we were pretty quickly able to establish a pretty good list of those varieties that had been hit very hard with it and those that didn't appear to be." That was Dan Phillips with the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. The southern stem canker has not been completely conquered in Georgia, but during the �90s up to 50 percent of the soybean varieties available to farmers were resistant to the disease. With more research scientists hope to find more varieties resistant to this deadly disease. John Harrell, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, reporting from Tifton.


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For more information about these files, contact John Harrell <jharrell@uga.edu> (229) 386-3805
For information about this site, contact Jennifer Cannon <gaaudio@uga.edu> (229) 386-3802